Thomas Career Consulting https://thomascareerconsulting.com Career Counseling, Resume Writing & LinkedIn Services Philadelphia Wed, 15 Jul 2020 22:06:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/cropped-Thomas-Career-Consulting-1-32x32.jpg Thomas Career Consulting https://thomascareerconsulting.com 32 32 Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Laura Kasper https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-laura-kasper https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-laura-kasper#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2020 23:32:09 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=1842 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she interviews Laura Kasper, CEO of Monarch Staffing.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Laura Kasper appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Laura Kasper

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Laura Kasper

 

Mindy Thomas:

Hi everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas and welcome to Career Chat. We are here every Monday at 11:30 AM and Tuesday at 8:00 PM. If anybody has their pulse on the local job market, my next guest really does everything from hiring trends to employer staffing, to recruiting, to job seeker advice. My next guest, and you want to stay tuned for her. She’s a powerhouse. Her name is Laura Kasper. She’s the CEO of Monarch Staffing. Laura, welcome to the show.

Laura Kasper:

Thank you. Excited to be here.

Mindy Thomas:

I’m excited to have you on the show and thank you for making time. I know it’s a very busy time for you, Laura. We go back many, many years when I was a director of placement at a technical college, I was floating the graduates to you. It was big time flush back then. Obviously we have a very different narrative today. I’d love to speak with you today about the impact of COVID-19 and what can job seekers expect, what can employers expect moving forward?

Laura Kasper:

Yep. So I think in today’s world, it’s a lot different than it was many years ago. You know, the unemployment right now is close to 15%. Job seekers are out there in abundance. Six months ago, I would tell you it was a candidates market. It’s going to be an employers market in the next three months. There’s going to be a lot of people that are going to want to get back into the workforce and with millions and millions coming back into the workforce there might be some pressure for a little bit lower wages and things might be changing. So if you are a job seeker, now’s a better time to jump into the market rather than waiting. Because the competition is going to be really stiff probably come at the end of August, the beginning of September,

Mindy Thomas:

And you’ve helped thousands of job seekers over a 25 year stint in this business, as well as hundreds of employers. So your company, not only staffs for employers they do HR consulting. What else do you do?

Laura Kasper:

Yep. And we do training. We do HR consulting. We’re helping employers with their handbooks and now because of the COVID-19 different protocols that employers need to use, when they’re bringing back into the people into the workforce, we were just notified by the governor of Pennsylvania that June 5th we’ll be in the yellow zone. So we’ll be allowed to gather in groups of 25 and more and more employers that I’m speaking with are starting to bring folks back into their workforce in different types of shifts. So things are changing, but we need to be prepared because everybody has to be ready with the PPE equipment. Your personal protective equipment, you know, coming to work with gloves, if you need it, definitely a mask. And you know, hand sanitizers are really important. You know, and gone are the days when people are going to be handshaking for an interview. Those days are gone. People are going to be doing zoom interviews. We’ve always been doing zoom interviews with snow storms. This is just a much bigger storm. So when you find the net, we’re talking to our candidates more and more with the zoom interview. So it’s been, it’s been really great.

Mindy Thomas:

Laura, when you mentioned protocols many of our viewers may not even understand that verbiage. Could you define that and talk about the safety protocols? Well, you just mentioned them, but are there other protocols that employers

Laura Kasper:

Extra layer of screening that now as a placement agency we’re required to do by law and asking certain questions for candidates before we actually place them on a physical job. You know, even if they’re getting trained, they might be getting trained at the location. One of our clients was creative enough to hire six customer service people. They brought them into the office, train them there with their trainer on video, and then they’re going to send them home after two weeks to work. Even in that case we had to ask questions about safety, you know, have they been you know, have they been come in contact with somebody that has Kobe 19 and do they have symptoms, whether it be a fever, a high fever or you know, the sore throat or the chills. So we have to ask that to protect them and to protect our employers.

Laura Kasper:

So there is an added layer of screening and employers are doing the same. Some employers are even bringing in equipment to test for temperature taking, whether it be a tablet on the wall, a thermometer that they’re giving people to, to come in. I mean, safety is the first and foremost concern on top of everybody’s mind, it’s both for the candidates and people that are returning to work and for the employers being safe in the workplace and even studying up like a six foot office space. One on top of the other. There’s a lot of reconfiguring with office spaces right now. And speaking to employers of how that’s gonna look, maybe the conference room once held 12 people at one time might have for the rest are going to be able to zoom for video.

Mindy Thomas:

The innovation that is going on is just short of incredible. I cannot believe what’s being invented right now to support the protocols, as you mentioned. I heard this morning from one of my clients that he has to sign a release. If he catches COVID on the job, because he’s like a sales person and asked to travel a bit they’re now requesting a release form. Have you ever heard of that?

Laura Kasper:

No, but there are some new rules are around a worker’s compensation. So that is in Congress and there’s new laws with you know, in the, that is out there that if you do catch Cove and Walt were the job of course might be able to collect workers’ compensation. So I think employers are coming to protect themselves. So the employment attorneys have been very, very busy we’re in the process of rewriting our handbooks, doing our new best work practices. So when we put people out to work, that they feel that they, you know, have a voice, they can come to us, they can ask us questions. We wanted to make sure that they’re cared for out in the work in the workforce. It’s important to them.

Mindy Thomas:

Everybody’s trying to CYA. Yes, exactly. Very, very interesting. Now you staff for everything from human resources to sales, could you run that down for our viewers so that they know? Sure. So we do put a bit of practice around administrative office support, customer service, sales marketing, getting accounting human resources, some entry level, it folks marketing. And we have been, you know, starting to see clients call us nor now there was a big pause early one. I think everybody was in survival mode. So we’re getting used to working at home. We know that work at home works. So now it’s a matter of how do we onboard new people. And the other thing that’s happening with the employers is somebody’s employees that they had might not be able to work just due to some personal circumstances. Maybe they have small children, maybe they have special needs children.

Laura Kasper:

Maybe they might not be able to come back the way the employer wants them to come back. And I do think there’s going to be a, quite a bit of uptake in new jobs being created. So they’re a bright shining star to this. There’s going to be new positions in human resources being created, whether it be extra nurses that are on, on the wellness side, whether it be people in the safety and OSHA that are more coordinators and helping with this COVID in fact, we just got an order from one of our clients on Friday, there is now a safety and HR coordinator. Cause the HR director is so busy. She needs an extra hand with all these new things and new rules and protocols. So I think the HR departments are going to be booming. So any of the new grads out there that are looking for an HR positions, we have a few that we’re building right now.

Mindy Thomas:

So definitely there’s a bright shining star with that. There is going to be more a wellness in the workplace. I think that’s very positive. Players are going to be more tuned in to employees and their wellness and offering things for the whole mind, body and soul and giving employees breaks during the day when they’re working. It’s okay to, you know, take a break in the middle of the day. It’s not so much managing the input. It’s managing the expectations and the output. I think that employers smart employers and good leaders are really looking at that as the CEO of Monarch staffing. I know that you have a team of recorders and I know that you also interview a lot of my clients that I send you. What are the things that you’re looking for when you do that zoom interview with a potential candidate, right.

Laura Kasper:

Right. I mean, so right now it is about, you know, they need the class of 2020, even kids graduating. I mean, these kids are, we’re looking for a resiliency. If we’re looking for adaptability, they have it, they’re thrown into this. They have to be creative. That’s what employers want. The other thing I think is really important now that we look for is when we do zoom interviews, is that people are showing up that they look the part, they are dressing as if they’re walking into an interview. So many times over the past couple months, we’ve had very casual people show up, maybe in a more casual atmosphere or just have their screen kind of wiggle on motion sickness. So I’m just gonna take on one of my [inaudible]. So, you know, tip for the job seeker, which are, you know, your, your phone in a tripod and keep it steady, you know, and they’re looking for either the communication skills and listening skills, same thing that they would be looking for.

Mindy Thomas:

I think if you walk into an interview, but I think now, because it is on zoom that has to come across and louder. Yes. I, you know, I have empathy for the introverts of the world. Right. It’s hard because really like now do you have any advice for them? Yes. So there’s a great book. It’s actually, Oh, I will send you the link Mindy, but it’s called a jobs job interviewing for the introvert, like job seeking for an introvert. I will definitely send you the link. It’s that by Jane Finkle. I already read it. Yeah. I’d like for introverts, it’s called quiet. And that is about leading as an introvert in today’s economy. Love it, great book. It will really help people. In fact, my daughter is an introvert and she said to me, mom, after this whole thing is done, I am, might become an extrovert.

Mindy Thomas:

You know, people had their tendencies. Oh my goodness. Well, do you have a little bit of empathy when you realize, cause I can pick it right out. Yes. And I mean, introverts, I mean, I remember asking my students back when I was a junked at Immaculata for 17 years. Well, what are you, who do you think makes the better salesperson, the introvert or the extrovert? And they always say the extrovert, but the introvert has tremendous skill, right? Laura, they listen, well, they don’t jump out of the gate. They’re discipline. They’re wa they’re disciplined. They take it, they take in all the detail and they take in all the information before they open their mouths. They’re process people very much.

Laura Kasper:

The process. I mean, I’ve, I’ve twin girls. So they’re one is very much an introvert and one is very much an extrovert, but you know, both can be leaders in their own unique way. And I think for an introvert, especially with this zoom interview, it can be a little intimidating just as if they were walking into an interview could be uncomfortable. But I think the more you practice and be prepared for the questions that you’ll be asked will really help because those folks need to be prepared. So, you know, doing your homework and they’re going to prepare, be prepared much more probably than the extrovert who thinks that they can come in and wing it. So, you know, I think that, you know, they could have a little bit of an advantage if they just take a little bit time in preparation. And now we have so much information that we can use today in our hand or at our fingertips. What are some of the questions

Mindy Thomas:

What about your recruiters ask that are just typical questions right out of the gate.

Laura Kasper:

Sure. you know, some of the things might, you know, share with me an example about how you’ve been able to be adaptable in this environment. You know, what, where, you know, we’re asking more behavioral type questions. So adaptability is really important. Give me an example of maybe a time where you may have failed. And what did you learn from it that could be you know, learning about how resourceful people are, employers, what candidates with critical thinking skills. So can they see the bigger picture is really important? Not so much yes. Doing the task is important, but they also have to be able, you know, it’s not in today’s world, it’s not about just keeping things the way they are. I mean, we are living in what we talked about before, maybe a VUCA environment with volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity. So how are people reacting during those times and what are they doing? It’s not about keeping things the same. It’s about breaking them and fixing them and being able to do it better and more efficient. So we ask candidates and these more seasoned candidates too, about some of their things that they were able to be. Some of the successes that they’ve had and even some of their failures and what they’ve learned through that,

Mindy Thomas:

From an employer’s perspective, how do you see the challenges snowballing for them? I mean, what are their biggest barriers and concerns moving forward?

Laura Kasper:

Yeah. Number one is safety. That’s the biggest pool. And number two, I mean, I know so many employers that have people that are just not ready to come back yet, but employers need to have workers come back because they have work to do so. They are it’s really hard for them right now because they do have their PPP loan, right? So a lot of small businesses under 500 employees got their loan money. So that loan money came a week or so ago. They only had eight weeks to use that money and be able to spend 75% of that on wages and healthcare costs. So, you know, for them to get a reimbursement or to be loan forgiveness, they have to have people come back on payroll. It’s really important. So there are job seekers out there help your employer and come back because it’s going to be a lot easier to come back now, then it will be three months from now.

Laura Kasper:

So, you know, if you want your employer to stay in business and to employ you, you want to come back now because three months from now, there’s going to be a bigger talent pool and employers might upgrade skills. We’ve already had companies call us to say, you know what, I’m going to bring that person back. I think I want to look for somebody else now because at a 3% unemployment, I was kind of hanging on to people, but at close to a 15% unemployment now in Goldman Sachs predicts by the end of the year, we might even be closer or peak at 20, 25%. That’s more than the great depression. There’s millions of people that are going to be out of work competition for those jobs is going to be really, really high. So if you’re a job seeker, you want to get back into the market. Now you’re going to be valued more. You’re going to get a higher wage and it’s, it’s your best opportunity.

Mindy Thomas:

So there are a lot of steps for the job Hunter to look at right now. We have to take a short break and we’ll come right back and let’s talk about what’s needed besides resume and LinkedIn. And of course, they’ve got to update the resume. They have to update LinkedIn. And there’s other things that we’re going to look at. As soon as we come right back, stay tuned.

Mindy Thomas:

Welcome back to Career Chat. I’m Mindy Thomas. I am with the CEO of Monarch Staff, Laura Kasper. We were talking about the millions of people on unemployment. Some of them are making more money on unemployment than they did at their jobs. Now there’s an upside clearly, but there’s also a downside. Can we address that for our viewers today?

Laura Kasper:

Yeah. So, you know, what’s going to happen in a few months from now is that millions of people are going to want to come back into the workforce. So the competition to find a job is only going to increase as more and more people are unemployed. So if you are a job seeker in today’s market, you want to work your networks now because you’re going to be able to command a higher salary. There’s not as many people looking for jobs right this minute. And you’re going to be able to kind of move forward in that company and you’re going to be respected along the way for it. And you don’t have as much competition. It’s all about supply and demand. So it is right now, it’s, you know, it’s still, you know, Kennedy it’s can still kind of get what they want, but in a few months when unemployment, all those people, millions of people want to come back into the workforce.

Laura Kasper:

It’s going to look different and it will be an employers market, again, not a candidates market. So smart candidates and smart job-seekers today. What to, you said, maximize your LinkedIn profile, you know, do your resume writing prep and make sure that’s great and see Mindy Thomas for that, you know, you know, prep one, your video interviews and your zoom interviews. But the other thing that you can do personally, is get out there and volunteer and help. The more you expand your networks with volunteering and connecting with people, the more job opportunities are gonna open up for you. So it’s not so much sometimes where you land, it’s the people along the way that make a difference in your life. And you can really create some of those networks now for yourself, your friends on Facebook and different things like that, that are out there.

Laura Kasper:

You know, don’t let being unemployed, get you down. And the other thing is really hone in on your professional development for goodness sakes. You can take Harvard classes for free now, personally, taking a coaching class that I never thought I’d be taking. I’m taking a coaching class with somebody from Germany, which is unbelievable. So there’s so much professional development that you can really work on now as a, as a job seeker that you would never have that opportunity to do in regular times. And I think you have to look at what you can do, not what you can do to really make a difference for yourself. And for those around you.

Mindy Thomas:

I agree, Laura, and that’s such great advice. Recruiters are going to ask, what did you do during COVID-19? And if you have a laundry list, you’re in good shape, it looks really good. You present, well, you let them know I did this. I did that. I got this certificate courses on Khan Academy or at Harvard, they’ll be very impressed with your initiative. And I think initiative is extremely important right now because there’s a lot of employers out there. They get a free out, if you have not really worked very hard and you were like a low performer and you didn’t really care, guess what? They’re not going to ask you back. Why? Because there’s a whole pool of people out there that are hungry and they have to support themselves and their families.

Laura Kasper:

Right? And I think it can go both ways, too. Mindy, I think as an educated job seeker, you should ask employers, what did they do? How are they reacting to COVID-19 with their employees? What did they do to get a really feel what employers are doing and how they treat their people that they have currently working for them that speaks volumes for an employer. And you can see some of those reviews on Glassdoor or things like that that are out there. So smart job seekers, you know, should really ask those kinds of questions. It’s all about, you know, I think that’s going to speak volumes going forward on the good things that employers are doing and how they’re helping and how they’re volunteering and giving back to their community. I’ve seen many, many over the past few months do things that are out of the box and extraordinary. And even people that are doing some really great things for this world. So I think it goes both ways, the job seekers and for the employers. So I know ourselves, we gave some free resume writing advice.

Mindy Thomas:

Yes, Laura to keep up with the trends what are you reading right now? Because I’m like a webinar junkie, you know, I, I just like the content is so so much. we’re flushed with content right now. I’m wondering what papers are you reading to get your sources and your information and, and who are you trusting now with facts and figures and the narratives with regards to the job market?

Laura Kasper:

Well, I, look, I look at often the PA unemployment website because that’s where we are. So I look at that I also am a big proponent of Flipboard. If you don’t know what Flipboard is, it is a great app I have on my phone and on my computer that I use to send me things that are crucial to the job market. So I get magazines from entrepreneur and fortune and money magazine, and it’s great if he’d be my daily feed every day. So I’m addicted to the I also, I do read a lot of like Dan some content on LinkedIn, some of my employer groups that are legal attorneys they’re coming out with some great things and I belong to the MEA, the mid Atlantic employers association. I’m reading a law firm there and the American staffing association as well to keep up on the career advice and what’s happening in our market. So that’s usually where I’m getting my feed from. And there’s a great book. I’m reading from Mark Devine, it’s called the way of the seal. And it’s about working in this Phuket environment and really how you’re able to, with your vision and clarity and insight, be able to get through a lot of these changes and help your team and being a leader for your team.Oh, okay. Very good. Very good. So other trends that are happening that the job hunters should be aware of, of anything else that we can add to this laundry list.

Laura Kasper:

Definitely the free professional development would be the top of my to do list. If I was a job secret during this time, the other part would be connecting with people, more people on LinkedIn, following companies on LinkedIn, that they like, that they admire on anything commenting on things. So maybe there’s a recruiter that has a comment or even an employer that has a comment about something showing interest in where they want to work and doing a little more research on that I think is really, really helpful. And connecting with staffing agencies. A lot of times, staffing agencies can get you seen where you might not be able to get seen. You might throw out all through the black hole of the applicant tracking system, but we have relationships and rapport with many, many employers. So they trust us and it’s easy for a one stop shopping.

Mindy Thomas:

So that brings me to this point and we have to close in about 60 seconds. If anyone is out there and they are interested in being rehired or working through Monarch staffing, how do they get in touch with you?

Laura Kasper:

Very easy. They can send their resume to resumes@monarchstaffing.com. They can give us a call. We’re answering our phones. So either way, you know, we’re available and we’re looking for candidates, we’re busy. We have jobs now. So I’m really happy within the past couple of weeks, we started to pick up and we have job opportunities that are available at various levels.

Mindy Thomas:

Well, Laura, this has been such a great time with you. I’ve enjoyed seeing you again, thank you for making the time to be on the show today, Laura.

Laura Kasper:

Thanks, Mindy. I really appreciate it.

Laura Kasper:

You bet. To our viewing audience, thank you for joining me here on Career Chat. We will be here next week. If you have any questions about the show or you need to direct a question to me, you can find me on LinkedIn or just strictly go to Thomas Career Consulting.com to our healthcare professionals. I want to thank you for your sacrifice and service. Thank you so much for helping the American public. We are in debt indebted to you. Have a safe and loving week with your family and be safe. Be brave, be strong. We’ll see you here next week.

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Laura Kasper appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-laura-kasper/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Sarah Johnston https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-sarah-johnston https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-sarah-johnston#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2020 23:20:17 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=1835 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she interviews Sarah Johnston about job search strategy during COVID-19.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Sarah Johnston appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Sarah Johnston

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Sarah Johnston

 

Mindy Thomas:

Hi everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas, and this is Career Chat. We air every Monday at 11:30 AM. And Tuesdays at 8:00 PM. Social networks are highly important and they’ve been researched since the 1930s. And what the surveys have shown is that career changers are finding jobs through acquaintances, friends of friends, simply just about everyone they know. But what we didn’t know was down the line, the eighth and ninth people outside the circle, they are also very valuable in helping you to find a job today. I feel very privileged to introduce you to my next guest. Who’s a subject matter expert. Her name is Sarah Johnston. She is known as the briefcase coach. She is a former corporate recruiter who turned into an executive resume resume writer and career coach, catapulting herself to success right away. She’s been featured on ABC, CBS LinkedIn and Business Insider. Sarah, welcome to the show.

Sarah Johnston:

Mindy. I am so honored to be here. It’s the highlight of my week is getting to have this conversation with you and help job seekers out there, land their next opportunity.

Mindy Thomas:

Oh, likewise. I’m very excited. You’re here. I didn’t mention one of your star accolades is Sarah is was voted last year as one of the top five voices to follow on LinkedIn. Well, you know how many people are on linked in? Congratulations, Sarah, that’s amazing.

Sarah Johnston:

So much. I have found, I guess my voice, if you will writing content on LinkedIn and, and just honored that I can inspire people and help people find jobs through what I write

Mindy Thomas:

Terrific, your business. You’re based out of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. And I know that you work nationwide probably on a global basis as well, working with college students all the way up to the C suite. And primarily you are writing the resumes and doing interview coaching as well as what else,

Sarah Johnston:

Job search strategy, which is what I think we’re going to talk about today. And what I’m most passionate about is helping people think strategically through their job search. So that the very first thing that they do, isn’t just launch on the job boards and apply for hundreds of and feel like their resumes going into an ATS black hole for really to take that step back and assess who they are and the value that they can bring to the organization, what their secret sauce is, and then how to attack a job search strategically. So they get greater results.

Mindy Thomas:

Before we jump into that, I would really like to understand how you found your voice and passion as a corporate recruiter. You were recruiting for a living. And obviously, I mean, I was a recruiter. I remember moving the words all around. I just loved finessing the words and moving them and making them look better, sound better and communicate the best message possible. What kind of recruiter were you back in the day and what made you move to be opening up your own shop?

Sarah Johnston:

Yeah, so most recently I was a healthcare recruiter. I worked for the largest children’s hospital in the country and loved the work that I did. It was very meaningful and I’ve worked for other companies and had recruited other industries as well, but I love the work I did, but realized one, I had a passion to help job seekers. I noticed that job seekers, you know, commonly made mistakes that help, or that prevented them from getting jobs, really great candidates for being passed over because they didn’t have to sell themselves or position themselves. And I wanted to be able to work with people on that one on one basis. And then two I’ve always really wanted to be an entrepreneur. I’ve always wanted to work for myself and getting to be a business owner. The briefcase coach was a lifelong passion of mine and it’s been a lot of fun.

Mindy Thomas:

How did you come up with the name Brief Case Coach?

Sarah Johnston:

You know, my husband and I swear we’re drinking a glass of wine one night talking about the type of work that I wanted to do. And you know, when you’re on GoDaddy searching for names that are still available dot coms that are still available, you might have a list of a hundred and we kind of took it down from there. And Bruce, his coach just made the most sense. And, and now that it’s my, now that I’ve learned it, it really fits because a briefcase is a tool that you take with you that helps you keep things together that helps you position for that next opportunity that helps you stand out. And I have a tool for job seekers as well. I helped them stand out and I help them be better position. And so you know, it’s not essential to have a briefcase. It’s not essential to work with someone like me, but I think it can really be the differential.

Mindy Thomas:

It’s really a catchy name, no doubt. Let’s get right to this subject of social networks and Mark Granovetter, who is an American sociologists, a Stanford professor. He did research in the area of social networking. Can you tell us a little bit more about his work and how important is for the job hunters to really exercise some proactive if you will execute on this because without it they’re really they’re really going to have a tough time in the, in these economic times.

Sarah Johnston:

Yeah. So when we were kind of discussing last week, what we could talk about, this is a subject that I’m really passionate about. And the reason is, is that often see, as we just mentioned, job seekers launching straight to the job boards and they start applying for jobs online and they get really frustrated by the fact that they’re not hearing from companies, companies on average get 250 applicants per position for a corporate role. And so as a job seeker, especially in these hard economic times where there’s a higher than average employment rate, you have to do something different to stand out. Martin innovator was a Stanford researcher and he did a lot of look into social networks. And this is back in the seventies. And did this study any found that shockingly, it’s not the strong times, the people that you know, really, really well it’s often the weaker ties that can be most helpful in a job search.

Sarah Johnston:

So when I’m talking to job seekers, I think there’s a lot of value in coming up with one, a target company list of all the places that you want to work. All the places that hire people like you for the job that you want to do, but to my mapping, your network, taking the time to really think through who you know, and from all the different buckets of life that you’ve known, people, people that you went to college with, people that you’ve worked with in your first job, people that worked with vendors from previous jobs, thinking through all of those relationships, because often as research shows and from Mark Granovetter and from my personal relationship with my clients, the people that you think are going to be the most helpful in the job search people that you think you can call it, they are often more resistant to pick up the phone. Whereas those weaker ties of seven, eight degree connections are more willing to introduce you to their connections are willing to endorse you and take that extra step on your behalf.

Mindy Thomas:

Well, it’s interesting, you know, there’s an old saying your net worth is your network.

Sarah Johnston:

I love that saying absolutely. It only takes one person to change the trajectory of your job search,

Mindy Thomas:

You know, and to piggyback on that, Sarah, you know, we look at employers, employers trust their employees to refer. I mean, look at the referral bonuses that are paid out on an annual basis. Why? Because onboarding someone that’s a loser in their eyes, or they got to get rid of a cost, just hundreds of thousands of dollars, billions of dollars to companies every year. So I think you agree that the employers do trust people to refer good people to them.

Sarah Johnston:

Absolutely social networking is so important. Think about it. If you’re going to go buy something on Amazon, you’re going to buy a $15 pound case. You’re probably going to read five reviews before you made that purchase. The same goes with hiring. You want to hire someone that someone else endorses, someone that you trust. They endorse them. You’re more likely to take a chance on them. So social proof matters, which is why as a job seeker, you have to leverage your network. This is the latest stat should 40 to 60% of people find their job through referral. And if you look at job bites data from last year, a significant number of candidates were hired through employee referrals. Companies are really putting a lot of stock in, in your pulley referral program. They’re prioritizing these communities and are even giving bonuses. As you mentioned to people who make referrals.

Mindy Thomas:

So one of the first steps is to paraphrase. What you have your clients do is they look at each bucket beginning with the old positions who they know current role or past roles who they know from their church, who they know from their social life, right?

Sarah Johnston:

Oh yeah. Who, you know, from your kid’s soccer team, I mean, you cannot overlook the values of the relationships that you make through your kids, through your parents, friends, these relationships all matter and often are people that you wouldn’t consider when you’re job searching, but you never know what somebody from your kid’s soccer team is the executive vice president of one of the companies on your target company list. And these are people who know you and can vouch for your character.

Mindy Thomas:

So what do you do with the list after you compile the list?

New Speaker:

Sarah Johnston:

After you’ve compiled the list, it’s important to also make that target company list as well. You also want to work. So the key is help people help you start setting up informational interviews. Maybe you can start with your warmer contacts. First, your biggest fans and people who know you, your champion circle, and go to them and say, Hey, Joe, I’m launching a job search. And you’re someone that I’ve always valued. You’ve always given me really good advice to kind of prop them up a little bit and say, you know, I’m looking to make a career change. And here’s a list of my target companies to bring to them, maybe a condensed list of your target companies. Did you know anybody in his list of companies? Do you know anybody that I should be having a conversation with? What do you know about this company? Do you like this company?

Sarah Johnston:

How do you feel like they’re doing profitable profit wise? Or do you feel like they’re successful? You will, should I be talking to you and then take that target company was to step further and look up who would be your boss on LinkedIn, figure out who you’d potentially report to. If you had the job that you want to have, and you could go to your network and say, do you know this person, could you help me get an introduction to that person? And so it’s all about getting decision-maker conversations. What works in network. You have to get decision to your conversations at your target company list.

Mindy Thomas:

That’s great advice. Great advice. So what about target companies? How do you know what companies to target? How do you find those companies? Are you Googling who are the best companies to work for in chapel Hill, North Carolina, or Philadelphia? What do you think about that?

Sarah Johnston:

This is an often overlooked step. I always asked job seekers. So do you have a target list of companies and people say, Oh yeah, I have like five or six companies that I want to work for. Well, here’s the news. You’re not fishing in a big enough pond. You really need to have a list of 25 to 35 target companies to build out that big of a list. You got to do what you mentioned. You have to Google best companies to work in Chapel Hill or whatever you’re areas will get. Those companies fastest brewing, whatever your industry is. Maybe you’re a CPG consumer product, good company, fastest growing CPG companies. Maybe you look on LinkedIn at people who are working at some of your target companies that you already know about and where they worked before. So kind of work backwards. See where people worked before.

Sarah Johnston:

If you’re interested in the startup, you could go to venture capital firms that back companies in your area. So maybe venture capital firms that fund CPG companies and see who’s in their portfolio to see if there’s any companies that could potentially be on your list. That way you can go to chamber of commerce websites, look on their websites to see who is active and engaged. That could also help you get that, create that list. On average, my clients spend about 20 hours of building out that target company list. And if you really take the time to do a deep dive research, your options, you’re going to have a lot more success because you don’t want to overlook a company that could be potentially a really great fit for you.

Mindy Thomas:

That is super advice. Listen, we have to take a short break. We’re going to be right back to continue the conversation and look at what should people that are employed right now. What should they be doing? We’ll be right back. Okay.

Mindy Thomas:

Hi, everybody. Welcome back to Career Chat. We are with Sarah Johnston, also known as the briefcase coach. She is talking with us today about what we should be doing if we’re employed right now or unemployed. So Sarah, let’s talk about some things that people that are employed right now. I mean, everybody’s a little bit worried. Even if you have a job, what should they be doing right now to ensure that they’re ready?

Sarah Johnston:

I’m going to borrow the words of another career coach. I respect Diana Chan and she says, everyone right now in these uncertain times should be following their ABCs. Always be connecting. If you have a job right now, you should make it your goal to try to connect with one new person every day, because it’s the relationships as we discussed that are going to help you land your next job. It would also be smart to update your LinkedIn, make sure that it’s keyword optimized so that someone could find you if they were looking for someone with your skill sets and brushed off your resume. You know, as we were talking between the, during the break right now, we’re hearing you and I are hearing from people. Who’ve had job security for most of their career and their job searching for the very first time, maybe in 20 years. And so if that’s you and you, haven’t had to launch a job search, the resume is changed. It looks very different today than it did 10 years ago, 15 years ago. And so if you aren’t fully invested in the job search, now now’s a great bet the best time to get ready and get your documents in order.

Mindy Thomas:

Great advice. One of my favorite career coaches is Kerry Hannon who targets the boomers out there. And last week I saw a quote that went like this networking is one letter away from not working. And it just like, I just thought, wow, that really says it all. So it is important to keep those connections going. The resume are there, is there anything new that’s come in that you could talk to? I mean, we always talk about using the action verbs for the achievements. Not putting on the addresses, but putting on the city, state and zip code, right. Having the LinkedIn URL right on the resume. Are there any other little tips right now that are coming out that people are including?

Sarah Johnston:

Yeah. You know, there was a study done by the ladders.com a couple of years ago. And I like to remind people with this study, it was a heat heat map of recruiters and how they read resumes in the study found that on average recruiters spend between six and 7.2 seconds scanning a resume before deciding they wanted to continue looking at a document or stop looking at it. And some of the takeaways, the key takeaways from this study is having a header at the top of the document that tells me you are. And the value that you can bring to the organization helps immediately give the recruiter, the person reading your resume, some context for who you are often using key words in a, like an executive summary section at the top that align with the job description. So even borrowing phrases from the job description and using it in your executive summary, can spoon feed the reader more of your value that aligns with that role. The more you can target and tailor your resume for the exact job, but better for that keyword match. And then binary using light design elements like bolding shading, some white space can help draw the eyes and texts and helping your resonating more readable.

Mindy Thomas:

I love all those tips and you and I were both recruiters back in the day. And the way I look at this is I don’t want my recruiter to have to read the entire resume front and back to figure out who my client is. We want to get it right away. You don’t have much time, so let’s get right to it. Put that branding message it right up front, maybe that little summary expertise, boom, and really sell to that job posting. I’ve always said, I read the job postings. Like they’re my recipes line by line word by word. So we’re always customizing. That’s incredibly important to make sure that you’re customizing your documents, whether it’s the LinkedIn narrative or the skillsets in LinkedIn against the resume. And certainly the cover letters. Let’s talk about cover letters for a second. 50% of the recruiters read them 50%. Don’t when I was a legal recruiter. If they didn’t have a cover letter, I really kind of shook my head. Like, gosh, you didn’t have enough time. Just send me a little letter. What do you think?

Sarah Johnston:

I think they can be a key factor for some hiring managers. If you know, 50% read it and want to see it, then you better send one. Especially if you’re a career changer or you’ve been laid off or you’re making a big pivot you need, this is where you can use this space to tell your story. You also want to make sure that you’re aligning your passion with the pain points of the job. The person reading the cover letter wants to see that you actually care about this particular position. And you’re not just blind applying to a hundred jobs.

Mindy Thomas:

You know, one of the mistakes that job hunters make is as soon as they get laid off, Oh, I got to get my resume done and they start calling and you say, well, what would you like to do? What, what is your target? And then I’ll do, I’ll do anything. I will do anything. Sarah, what’s your response

Sarah Johnston:

Marketing one-on-one is know your target audience and know what they care about. And so as a job seeker, it can be really tempting to try to be all things to all people and to try to create a one size fits all resume or to try to go after 50 different opportunities. But the thing is, is you’re doing yourself a disservice because hiring managers want to hire someone who’s a perfect fit for their job. They want to hire someone who really deeply cares about the organization and the mission and the work that they do. And the only way that you’re gonna get their attention is if you convey that message. But if you convey that you care about all things, then, then you’re not going to, you’re going to miss out there. You’re not going to get their attention. So for a job seeker who is feeling frustrated or in the trenches or desperate that reeks, and it actually turns hiring managers off. So it’s, it’s very important to be targeted, have a targeted message and understand your unique value proposition and your special sauce that you bring to an organization.

Mindy Thomas:

That’s all great. And, and the, and the fact is that if you write a generic resume, you’re not going to get seen the ATS, won’t pick you up and you’re going to end up at square one, again, being frustrated. So clarity is very important. There’s an ultimate success formula out there that my favorite all time, coach Tony Robbins it’s, it’s actually called the ultimate success formula and there are four steps to it. One is clarity is power. Number two, take action. It’s not enough to know what you want. You got to do something about it. Number three, notice what’s working and what’s not. And then four change your approach till you get what you want. If you are not clear on step one, you’re never going to get to success out here in this economic times. It’s funny. I was reviewing a resume this morning. And the, I, I was really impressed that someone had actually put in two of their bullets that they had contributed to COVID-19 at this particular company, a variety. I forget what it was, but I just saw COVID-19. I said, this person’s on target. You know, they are including their contributions right now. What do you think about that, Sarah? Isn’t that fantastic?

Sarah Johnston:

Oh, I love that. That was so smart. [inaudible] Innovate.

Mindy Thomas:

It, it, it was really you know, fantastic. I was just, so it was the first time I’ve seen a resume during the last two months that actually mentioned COVID-19 and the contributions. Right? So what other issues are coming up for your clients right now? Given the economic uncertainty are people looking to change careers or just get their resumes done and get, and ramp up the search. Are they looking to get out of, of industries completely

Sarah Johnston:

Seeing both? I’m seeing people whose industries have really taken a hard, hit people from the tourism and travel industry. We’re having to make a pivot. And what they’re doing is they’re really looking at the value that they offer and highlighting their transferable skills. And we’re looking at other industries where they can apply those transferable skills. So I am seeing people who are making career pivots because of hard hit industries. I’m also CC, and I bet you are too many of your client work. Just people are feeling anxious. They’re seeing the unemployment numbers. And even though they may be in a job and maybe, maybe very happy in the job, there’s some fear and anxiety right now. And I hope for people listening that they will walk away from, from this conversation, I’m a little bit less anxious because when you, when you’re anxious, you don’t perform at your best. You’re not as relatable. It’s, it’s hard, it’s hard to get breakthrough. And so whatever you can do focus on like giving us that energy, maybe that’s prayer, maybe that’s meditation, maybe that’s exercise, whatever you need to do to release that anxiety. I would encourage you to do that right now. Cause there’s sensing a lot of it in people.

Mindy Thomas:

Well, I think that that’s great advice, job. Cause we have to wrap up in just 60 seconds, but what’s the importance of, of joining a job club today?

Sarah Johnston:

Oh, I’m a huge fan of John clubs. If you go to that website, www dot briefcase, coach.com. There’s a whole section on my website for job clubs. These are free organizations that are community sponsored that give you job search news, help you find new community, helping you get matched with other people in your, your area that will help you land a job. And I just think that these are lifelines for many job seekers.

Mindy Thomas:

It’s like phone a friend, right? Well, Sarah, I can’t thank you enough for making time for us here at career chat and for my audience, this has been a fantastic dialogue with you. And thank you so much for agreeing to be to be on our show today.

Sarah Johnston:

Thank you for the opportunity. This has been wonderful.

Mindy Thomas:

Welcome. And to our viewing audience, especially our medical professionals are first responders, everyone out there that is really helping the American public get back on your feet. Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. We will be here next week. Same time, same place. We look forward to seeing you again on career chat.

Speaker 5:

[Inaudible].

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Sarah Johnston appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-sarah-johnston/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Curt Woolford https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-curt-woolford https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-curt-woolford#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2020 22:55:19 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=1825 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she interviews Curt Woolford, Mindfulness Coach. Mindfulness helps the job seeker reduce anxiety, stress and insomnia.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Curt Woolford appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Curt Woolford

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Curt Woolford

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Curt Woolford appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-curt-woolford/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Beth Kennedy https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-beth-kennedy https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-beth-kennedy#respond Thu, 14 May 2020 15:39:32 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=1565 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she interviews Beth Kennedy about the impact of stress on the American public and the strategies one can use to combat it.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Beth Kennedy appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Beth Kennedy

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Beth Kennedy

Mindy Thomas interviews Beth Kennedy about how Covid19 has impacted the levels of stress on the American public. 

Mindy Thomas :

Hi everyone. I’m Mindy Thomas and this is career chat and we air every Monday at 11:30 AM and Tuesday nights at 8:00 PM. No one is immune from stress. In fact, there was a recent Gallup poll that surveyed nearly 8,000 people, 23% said they were burned out or over the top. Another 43% said they experienced high levels of stress. So it’s, it’s now with the Covid 19 on top of regular workforce drama and suffering, if you will. We have a ton of stress put on our backs and bringing you an expert today, Beth Kennedy coming in from Boston, Massachusetts. She’s the CEO, of Benatti Training and Development. Beth, Welcome to Career Chat.

Beth Kennedy:

Thank you Mindy. Really excited to be here.

Mindy Thomas :

Excited to have you. Beth, you’re known as a resiliency coach. I call you the burnout coach. Where did you find this passion for helping people through burnout and stress? Where does this come from?

Beth Kennedy:

So it comes from my own personal experience of what I call down the burnout escalator. So many years ago after graduate school, I received my dream job offer working in the Boston public school as a school outreach counselor. And I loved it. I thought I’d retired doing that kind of work. And one of the things that used to drive me crazy was there were so many burnt out teachers. And I’m like, that’ll never be me. Year seven, I started going down that burnout escalator. I was exhausted. I was losing my excitement. But the worst thing happened and that was, I became a clock watcher. And that used to drive me crazy. The teacher should still leave and make it to their cars before the students would leave their lockers. So I was so frustrated when I started watching the clock and realizing I was going through some of those burnout symptoms and decided I needed to make a change. So I’ve always studied stress management since college. And my mission now, or my organization is to prevent burnout and to have every professional, every individual focused on resiliency.

Mindy Thomas :

Well Beth, you are a recent author. You just published this smash success in my eyes called career recharge and you talk about the resiliency strategies, how to prevent burnout. Can you walk us through this little model so we can get an idea of what this is about and if people could really be successful at deflating the stress and the burnout in their lives?

Beth Kennedy:

Sure. So the cornerstone of the book is what I call the Benatti resiliency model and it’s named after my dad because he was the most incredible resilient entrepreneur. He owned his own moving company, family moving company in New York. And as I walked through the model, I’ll share some other little tips as well. So, the first strategy is wellbeing. And what I mean by that is focusing on your physical, emotional, and spiritual health. The second is self awareness, being aware of what is your purpose, what’s that true or, and it might be professionally, but it also might be personally. And do you have a growth mindset and are, do you have awareness of your personality type and how that affects you? And your stress level. The third area is what I call brand and resiliency experts. Don’t focus on brand, but it’s really important because this is your unique attributes and this is what makes you stand out, the impact that you make in your career, but also what is your reputation? And the fourth area is connection. And that is cultivating relationships personally and professionally and bodily innovation. How do you challenge yourself? And I don’t mean just at work, but also in your own hobbies and your own fun activity.

Mindy Thomas :

Well, that model sounds all well and good, but how do we put that into planning and executing on this type of, these types of strategies? So when you’re looking at wellbeing, what kinds of strategies do you have that would help us with our wellbeing?

Beth Kennedy:

Great question. Mindy, I think really important about my book, career recharge, is that the goal for everyone to have customized strategies for you? So actually as people go through my process, they’re a unique, what I call resiliency boosters. And these are customized for you. So you read through when you decide, Ooh, I think this could add impact or I think that could add impact. I think it’s important for me to mention where this came from. I was a coach for the Gillette company for many years and when P and G purchased them, it was a huge transition. How did the people that are losing their jobs, and I’ve worked with many of these people and one of the things I found was there were key ways that people were moving forward, really moving forward, really being resilient. And I noticed there were five common areas and these were these five areas, wellbeing, self-awareness, brand connection and innovation.

Beth Kennedy:

But to go back to your question what I want to do is just share with you how it works. So for example, for wellbeing somebody, this might be, you might just decide, Oh, I need to focus on my wellbeing. This is a booster that I have in my book. When dealing with work and personal stresses, ask yourself, what is in your control? Focus on what you can change rather than stressing out over what you cannot control. So it’s really taking a step every day and asking yourself three questions. And I called this my Friday five, and what I mean by that is only takes five minutes. It started by my clients doing this every Friday. But I would encourage you during this transition for all of us to ask ourselves these three questions. The first question is, what would my resiliency wins this week or today?

Beth Kennedy:

So what did I do? Did I go for a walk at lunch? Did I go, you know, do I call a friend? What did I do to move myself forward? Resiliency. Does it mean we just let ourselves be clobbered and we just survive? Resilience means we arrived. The second question is, what is my resiliency goals for tomorrow? And the third question is, how am I going to make this happen? So that’s that key about these resiliency strategies, scheduling it into our calendar, especially times like the third. So much stress. We’re on a roller coaster ride. So we need to be practicing small resiliency strategies like deposits in a bank account. They need to be happening all day long.

Mindy Thomas :

I see. So, there must be a real uptick right about now. Yes. In your business, you’re coaching nurses and doctors and first responders and essential workers right now. And so are the methods and the strategies that you are talking about, are they working for your client base right now?

Beth Kennedy:

I’m working with a lot of scientists and doctors. And I think what, what has made me feel really great is that one thing that keeps saying is that word reached out. They said that it is so helpful to think simple and to have strategies so that I can get through that next day because we forget all of the things that everyone’s stressed. It’s so different. So I have clients that are working with all the different time zones in Europe and around the world because they want to be available to other doctors and that’s exhausting. So we need to have strategies of disconnecting. But realizing right now, some people are involved in really important projects that they have to be giving a lot more than they sending normally are.

Beth Kennedy:

So it’s been great to hear three things from my clients that my strategy has been enhanced, enhancing their resilience. They feel like at the end of the day they’re making an impact and they’re, they’re having influence over others because it’s so important these days to be making sure we’re connecting with colleagues, we’re connecting with close friends. Again, we need to keep recharging ourselves because it’s so easy to run on empty. And I think we’ve all been feeling that. And to remember there is not just one magic answer that we all have to be responsible for ourselves. We have to look out for others. And we have to really focus on this idea of our resilience.

Mindy Thomas :

Well, it is, it’s very difficult to get yourself up out of the rabbit hole. A lot of people are going dark right now. They’re isolating. There were people that suffered from depression and other mental illness Pre Covid. Now we have Covid layered on top of this. So I’m just wondering, could you tell us a little success story about one of your clients that used implemented and executed on your strategies? Do you have anyone in mind that you could tell us about?

Beth Kennedy:

Yeah, for some reason a woman that I coached, her name is Lee, just popped into my mind just because I’m thinking about the transition that we’re all going through. I just a little background, she had her MD and PhD degree in and her passion was accurate cancer and I was hired to help her be more impactful at meetings because she had a very quiet temperament and we were working through the model. It was about five and a half months. We were working together. She only had two weeks left and she started having some serious medical issues. So, I get this call from her and she and I knew something was going on, but I had no idea if that’s specific. And she said back, I have some good news to share with you, but some really bad news to share with you. So, she shared with me the bad news first.

Beth Kennedy:

And it was that she’d been diagnosed with brain cancer was less than six months in the left. Oh my goodness. And I was in a shock. So my 25 plus years of coaching, I’ve never had anyone just come out and share this today. And you know, one of my typical coaching sessions, but then she said something that made me really fall off my chair. And she said, well, the good news is I spoke with my HR manager and with my own manager and I can continue to have coaching for as long as I can continue to work. And I said to her, Lee, you know, is this really the best use of our time together? And she said, there’s something I want you to know. I’ve been in, I’ve been through school for so many years. I’ve been studying and I’ve been trying to cure cancer.

Beth Kennedy:

And what I’ve learned through working through your resiliency model is how important, not only resilience is, but knowing our purpose. And she said, I am so clear that right now my purpose is to cure cancer for as long as I’m on this world. So I am so supportive that my company is providing me with coaching so that I can continue to move forward. And one of the things she said that I still I just always remember is she said, and it also makes me think about what’s most important to me in my life. What matters most? So I think at these times of transition, and you were talking about, you know, people going through challenges with depression, with cancer, with all these things, there’s so many layers in what’s going on today. I think one of the things we all need to think about is what matters most. And sometimes some of the stressors that we’re facing, there are so many other people with more intense challenges going on every day. So I feel really grateful when I think about Lee and I was able to coach her for the next six months till she passed. And it’s just a nice legacy that I feel like I’ve been able to leave with my Benatti resiliency model,

Mindy Thomas :

Heartbreaking story. That but what a tribute to your coaching and your expertise. It’s really important to know your purpose and the why behind what you do. Simon Sinek speaks up and wrote a book about the why. Right. And so I, I’m wondering about you and, and what kind of strategies you use on a daily basis to cope with the stress because your job is full of talking to stressful people. All you’re coaching them day in and day out. How do you handle that stress yourself?

Beth Kennedy:

Yeah, great question. Thank you. So one of the things that I do is I’m definitely, and again I don’t recommend what I do is necessarily the best method or strategy for everybody, but it’s, I will share with you kind of what my schedule looks like because I am scheduled person. So the first thing I do is exercise. I’ve been really appreciative of all the different YouTube videos that are out there, the yoga, weightlifting. We also have an elliptical in our house. I try to do 20 minutes on the elliptical every other day and that’s how I kick off my morning. And then my favorite to get my favorite cup of tea go to my office. And then I do a 10 minute meditation and I use the calm app. And if people aren’t familiar with that, it’s calm.com and they offer a pretrial period.

Beth Kennedy:

I would highly recommend it right now. And again. One of the things about meditation, which is so wonderful is we all have that monkey mind. It’s mind right now. We’re making so many decisions. We’re getting so much decision fatigue and meditation is the chance to press the pause buttons and we’re still gonna have monkey mind, but it gives us a chance to press pause, recharge our brain, which is so important at a time like this. So I do that. That’s something that I do every morning. 10 minutes and then I get into my day. So to start my day I, I take out a posted note and I write down three things. What is my resilience going to look like today? By am I going to go for a walk in the afternoon? The second thing is impact.

Beth Kennedy:

I need to get done today cause it’s so easy to kind of get all over the place with everything going on. And the third is influence. You know, who do I need to reach out to? Is there a company that I need to follow up with? Is there a webinar I need to finish? So that provides me the best structure for my day. And then at the end of the day, it’s really important for me to figure out a way to recharge. It’s so hard working from home. I’m used to being in Boston, so it’s easy for me to keep checking emails and keep, you know, working. So by five 30, I sign up to go for a nice walk with our dog, Naples, who’s been a life saver. And then I kind of transitioned to the evening, really try to be mindful making dinner, but remind myself, it’s like everyone else is going to be ups and downs. There’s going to be grumpiness. But recharging is so important.

Mindy Thomas :

It seems a part of the success to this program as attaching very concrete and tangible concepts to it to attach that to the, the program. We have to take a short break. I’d like to come back in just a few minutes after our commercial break and talk about how important it is to have tangibles attached to each of those things you spoke about. We’ll be right back.

Beth Kennedy:

Okay. Sounds good. Thanks.

Mindy Thomas :

Hi everybody. Welcome back to Career Chat. We are with Beth Kennedy, the CEO of a Benatti Training and Development right out of Boston. She is known as the resiliency coach. I call her the burnout coach because she is all about helping people work through the stress of burning out in their given careers. Beth, we talked about the Friday five. What is that?

Beth Kennedy:

Okay, so I not mentioned it real quickly in the beginning. So one of the strategies that I do with all my clients is that an all of you can do it right now is you take out your phone and you plan five minutes, you put in your phone, recharge in all caps and you do it at a time in the morning. So when you have your cup of coffee or a cup of tea and then you’re get, like Mindy said, I like to be very have very smart goals, specific, measurable action oriented results, timely. You set a timer for five minutes and during that five minutes you are going to ask yourself, what is my resiliency goals for today? How am I going to do that? Cool. What’s my action item? And then the third part is what is my goal for the next day? So basically by spending five minutes every Friday, you’re planning your goals out for the week. But I’ve been recommending to people during this transition to do it every morning. So five minutes of resilient planning a day can add impact, influence and recharge.

Mindy Thomas :

I love it. I love it. Let me ask you this. What do you think you’ve learned the most as a result of working in this area of resiliency? What, what’s coming up for you as a result of your learning?

Beth Kennedy:

What, what has been the biggest shock to me is how much you can love your career and still burn out. And I think we’re seeing that a lot with healthcare professionals, doctors. One of the things I’ll, I’ll never forget one of my corporate clients and, and I was interviewing this individual and everything she said was, I love my job, but she was so glad she had no assets. And I kept on giving her examples and finally I said, is everything okay? And she said, I’m just exhausted. But I really liked my job. And I think the part that’s so important for me to work for everyone to realize is at different times in our career, we’ve made to go on down that burnout escalator and we need to pay attention to that. And the most exciting news is that we can go right up the escalator and I call it pressing the button up the elevator and we can recharge ourselves.

Beth Kennedy:

So and the reason why I call myself the resiliency coach is…. I’m about preventing burnout. And I feel like this needs to be a competency that all organizations need to be adding to their toolbox. I’m thrilled right now that I have a full day class that goes with the book career recharge and I’m thrilled right now I’m offering to companies in webinar format and all employees are getting the books. So I think organizations throughout USA are starting to realize, you know, resilience is a key competency and it can help all of us move forward.

Mindy Thomas :

Interesting. Beth, are you saying then that someone could love their job, be burning out and not know they’re burning out?

Beth Kennedy:

Yes, yes. And in my coaching, I can think right now of three or four people just from the last six months that when I did their intake, I ask a very crucial question. I asked them what keeps them up at night. And also when I ask this question, there’ll be a lot of very painful things that come up about their career. So they love their career, but there’s so many aspects that are pushing them down that burnout escalator. And sometimes it’s because they work so hard that it’s hard for them to have boundaries and sometimes they’re not other areas of their life to focus on.

Mindy Thomas :

In other words, they have no personal life. Right. And they are really focusing in on their work. What kind of issues when you ask them, what are you staying up at night and what’s bothering you? What are the pain points? What are some examples of what’s bothering them? Maybe our audience can relate with that.

Beth Kennedy:

Yeah. one example that actually someone just said to me yesterday, was she, every, every time she has a meeting with their manager, she put on another new project because she’s the one that gets it done. So she said, isn’t this unbelievable? I’m the one who gets it done and I’m spread so thin. I don’t want to say no because you know, I’m a high achiever. So I think, I think we have to also kind of think about that we should all think about our definition of success. And I gave her that as a homework assignment. So success is not for me. It’s not just achieving my goal, it’s about having time for what’s most important in my life. So for some of these high hardworking professionals, I had them think about what does success mean to you? And maybe it does mean at 5:00 PM or 6:00 PM turning off that computer and getting disconnected, but also having some hard conversations with your manager that we can’t be everything to everybody.

Mindy Thomas :

So Beth, you’re really defining values. What’s near and dear to your heart? What makes you happy on the job? I think probably these folks, when you actually define those values, maybe none of them are getting met.

Beth Kennedy:

You know what? You nailed it, Mindy. One of the exercises that I have in my book is called the purpose my map. And I take the reader through it step by step. And the first step is I have them determine their values. So for all of these employees that I work with in coaching, they also do this purpose mind map. And often the first thing that comes back is, these are my values. These are my top seven values, but I’m only getting two of them and we know that’s what we need to start working on. I think at time like this, we all need to take a step back and think about what is working in our career. It’s never going to be perfect. But is there something that can be tweaked a little bit?

Beth Kennedy:

This is an opportunity for reflection and it’s an opportunity to have the courage for some of these conversations. But also I think we have to remember our careers can, can’t be a hundred percent everything. So how can I get some of these volunteer, some of these values outside of work. And what I wanted to share was I just had a client on email me to incredible volunteer work she’s doing for the rotary club and I’m going to actually feature her next month in my blog because you can actually be involved online with E rotary clubs and be making a difference all over the world. So volunteer work is a huge value that helps prevent

Mindy Thomas :

Part of what’s going on. Beth and you know this better than anyone that people are running the 50 yard dash all day long. They don’t have time to reflect, they don’t have time to take a breath. Some people like the pharmacist can’t even go to the restroom, eat, launch. I mean there are occupations that are really struggling where people, I should say people are struggling and occupations where they just can’t take a breath. You said, listen, let’s go with five minutes on the calm app today. Just five minutes. That’s what I asked my client to do. I use insight timer. That’s my favorite. But like let’s just do one five minute meditation and let me let, let’s listen to it so you can hear what that sounds like. I’ll tell you what, when I listened to insight timer and I take whether it’s five minutes or 22 minutes on a meditation app, I’m telling you, it does something really magical for me. And I know that you agree, Beth, that you know you’re doing the meditation and the yoga. We do a lot to support our mental health as practitioners out here in a very chaotic world. So we have to close in just a minute. I really like you to tell the audience they want to get in touch with you. If they want to buy your fabulous book called career recharge, where do they need to go and how do they get in touch with you?

Beth Kennedy:

Okay. So I would just want to thank everyone for listening today and for Mindy for this opportunity. My book is available on Amazon. It’s called Career Recharge : Five Strategies to boost resilience and beat burnout and it’s available as an ebook. It’s still available as an audio book. If you would love to hear some resilience tips, you can find out I have a monthly newsletter and you can find that on my website@www.bethkennedy.com and if you’re on LinkedIn, send me a little note to say that you saw me on Mindy’s career chats and I would be happy to connect with you on LinkedIn cause it’s a great way for all of us to kind of share our wisdom and also just to continue to move forward with our resilience.

Mindy Thomas :

Well, Beth, thank you so much for this valuable interview and all the resources that you shared with our audience. Thank you so much. I want to say to our viewing audience, especially our healthcare professionals, please be safe. Thank you for your service and sacrifice, especially our essential workers, our medical teams, and everyone else that is out there trying to fight the Corona virus for us, the American public, to the rest of my audience. A lot of things are changing, but one thing that won’t be changing is you can count on career chat. We’re here every Tuesday at 8:00 PM and Mondays at 11:30. I will see you next week. Be safe, be strong.

 

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Beth Kennedy appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-beth-kennedy/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Dena Leftkowtiz https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-leftkowtiz https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-leftkowtiz#respond Mon, 11 May 2020 15:04:50 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=1562 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she talks with her guest, Dena Leftkowitz about the current Pandemic and problems facing job hunters.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Dena Leftkowtiz appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Dena Leftkowtiz

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Dena Lefowitz

Mindy Thomas interviews Dena Lefkowitz about how she made it through the last great economic meltdown and shares tips on how to make it through the coronavirus pandemic.

Mindy Thomas:

Hi everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas and this is career chat and we air every Monday at 1130 and Tuesday nights at 8:00 PM today my guest is Dena Leftkowitz .a Lefkowitz, the owner of achievement by design. She is the founding principal and the go to career coach, mostly for attorneys, but she works with executives on a nationwide basis. Welcome to the show, Dina. I’m so glad that you’re able to make time for us cause I know it’s a very busy time for you.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Thank you so much for having me, Mindy. I’ve been really looking forward to this chat we’re going to have today.

Mindy Thomas:

Likewise, I remember when we met Dena, it was the financial crisis of 2008 I was an unemployed legal recruiter and you were an unemployed attorney, but what struck me about you, Dena, was that you up and quit your job in the middle of the worst financial crisis back then and took a, it took a lot of guts to do that. So what I’d love to do is go back to that career pivot if you will, and then let’s talk about tips and tricks for our unemployed workers right now, 27 million at this point, and then I’d love to go into your coaching practice, your typical client, what you offer clients right now.

Dena Leftkowitz:

2008 was an extremely pivotal year for me Monday, and it cracks me up that you’re here. We here, we were at the, at the international coach Federation, both of us in similar transition situations. Would you like me to start first with some tips with, for people who are unemployed right now or talk about my career transitions and how I successfully pivoted.

Mindy Thomas:

Well, let’s get right to it. Let’s look at the tips and tricks for our unemployed and those that are sitting on the edge. Just waiting.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Yes. First of all, there are two mindset things that I want you to be aware of. There was an expression in 1939 which was also a time of great upheaval and it went keep calm and carry on. And I can’t think of anything more important than to be calm because when you’re threatened, your anxiety goes up and your judgment goes down. And it’s hard to think of creative strategies, solutions and a way out when you’re terrified. So you need to find a way to stay calm. And that’s not just a matter of flipping the Swift as you know, you can’t just tell somebody calm down. You have to find some tools and strategies for keeping yourself in a calm state of mind. Most of the time everybody’s a little anxious these days, including me. But we have to maintain our equanimity. And the second mindset thing I want to talk about is you aware of statistics can scare the pants off of you.

Dena Leftkowitz:

And the thing about them is they’re only really good when it comes to trends and averages. Statistics won’t say whether you are going to get another job, whether you are going to have a successful career. So for things like what industries are picking up or where it might be a good place to go look at statistics, but don’t think of them in terms of defining you, whether you’re unemployed, whether you think you’re too old to get another job. I have seen people get jobs under all circumstances and in fact within the last three weeks, three clients got jobs, started new jobs, which is an interesting thing in the age of Corona virus to begin a new job. And two of my clients got promotions. So employers are always hiring. So don’t let the statistics get, get in your head too.

Mindy Thomas:

Do you know? Those are great. Those are great tips. I’d like to go back to number one was keeping calm. There are a variety of strategies to keep calm today. Meditation, truly taking the time out to breathe, getting outside, no matter if that temperature is 50 degrees here in Philadelphia or 40 degrees, wrapping up and getting outside and breathing because it does make you feel happier. I hear this right now from friends and clients that doing that little bit of exercise, even if it’s stretching, those kinds of tips are great for calming down. Do you have any other strategies you’d like to add to that list?

Dena Leftkowitz:

One of the things that’s really important now is to try to stay in the present moment. If you start thinking back where you should be, where you wish you had been or too far ahead, that could really ratchet up your anxiety because then you start thinking of the parade of possible horribles that might be coming down the pike and none of those things might happen. So the idea is to try to stay in the present moment and I have found affirmations to be very helpful in doing that because they are always stated in the present moment. Things like all as well, everything is working out for my highest good out of this experience. Only good will come and I am safe. I love all of those things are true right now. As you and I are sitting here,

Mindy Thomas:

I love affirmations. I jump out of bed. No, no lie. I kid you not and I say like Tony Robbins, yes, it’s going to be a great day. Mend and I jump out of bed no matter what is on the table on the docket here I say those words because I know that attitude has to do with everything and even though our unemployment numbers are staggering, to your point, there are people getting hired right now and I’ve had five clients in the last month, young college grads, all the way up to a CFO, a VP of HR that we interviewed last week and another operations person who landed. So although the number of positions have shrunk and yes, the competition is very keen right now. So that brings us to another point, doesn’t it?

Dena Leftkowitz:

Yes, but I was really glad you mentioned Tony Robbins because he is the example of why statistics are not the be all and end all. If I looked at the statistics for what coaches make on average 25 to $50,000 a year, it might not have seemed like an attractive field for me to go into. But look at Tony Robbins and look at many other people who are successfully doing it. So that’s a really good example of why not to trust on statistics too much.

Mindy Thomas:

Yes, he’s one of the most masterful coaches in the world and I’ve been following him for about 30 years, believe it or not. Now Dina, other tips and tricks obviously people’s resumes have got to be fine tuned. In fact, I got a call yesterday, persons gainfully employed at a major farmer company, but guess what? She’s on the move. She wants an update now and it’s been three years. There are many skills that she has gained in the last three years and we need to update that resume as well. She wants her LinkedIn narrative rewritten because the way it was three years ago is not the same today. So I’m sure you agree the resume and LinkedIn and the photograph need to be super sharp and the resumes gotta be lean and mean. Yes.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Okay. Yeah. So your client isn’t the only one who’s on the move right now. One of the things that quarantine has brought out in people is discernment, is this really what I where I want to be? Is this really what I want to be doing? One of my clients said, I had no idea how stressful my hour long commute has been on a daily basis and still I until I stopped doing it. People are starting to notice what they’re tolerating and there is going to be a lot of movement in the career arena. Exactly what you said. Take stock of your skills, assess

Dena Leftkowitz:

Write down what has happened since the last time you did a resume and update your resume. Take stock of your values. What do you really love to do? Just because you need a job doesn’t mean that you’re not in the career management business anymore. We’re still looking at the big picture, the long term, what a next good step might be for you. Refine your technology skills. When Mindy and I first planned this interview, it was going to be live in a studio. We were both going to have our hair done and here we are now in our homes using, so before this interview I sat in front of my computer and I figured out a good height, the good color, the good lighting. And if you’re going to a zoom interview, you need to do the same thing. You need to become comfortable with the technology so that you can manage it.

Mindy Thomas:

Yes. And Dena, if you see my hair lopsided, cause I’m like Anderson Cooper, I’ve been cutting my own hair and drilling my gel manicure off, trying to, anyway let me ask you I, I hate to interrupt, but I do want to ask you about survival jobs. Do people take a job right now that is not even in their lane? We call that back in the Oh eight crisis. The survival job, right? Do they do that right now? I know everybody needs a paycheck. So what do you say?

Dena Leftkowitz:

I say don’t take the first thing that comes down the pike. If you can help it because this is still your career and if he takes something that you know you’re going to hate, that the idea of starting just makes you feel like crying that makes you feel dispirited. It’s not going to be the best move for you. I understand that you have a mortgage to pay and you have responsibilities, but it’s still a time to think about, even if you take a survival job, like I’ll skip forward to to the job I took in 2008 I was, I left a job right before the financial crisis hit because I was so certain I would get another one and land, well, I was network, I was an expert in my field. I was known. I was being courted by firms and I just didn’t have any concerns that I would find another job.

Dena Leftkowitz:

A couple months later, I’m sorry, very shortly after that Lehman brothers filed for bankruptcy and everything dried up and there weren’t any jobs. So here I was 20 years out of law school, unemployed, no offers, and also feeling like I didn’t want to spend another 20 years as a lawyer. I took a job that was in a way a survival job because it was lower salary than I was making before. It was a lower title than I had before. It was two hours away and it was outside of my field. But here’s the thing, that job represented an interesting opportunity. It was a brand new office opening in Harrisburg and it was going to create a lot of new law and it was a chance to do something that I hadn’t done before. So I was picked for that job, not because I had the ideal experience, but because I had a lot of experience.

Dena Leftkowitz:

I had talent, I had a skillset and I was interested so that at the time I saw it as a survival job because less money, less title, less everything. But sometimes when you pivot you have to take a side step or even a step backwards. And at the end of the day in that job, I ended up being the general counsel. I ended up having opportunities to lobby lobby Congress and the Senate for funding. I testified before the Senate, I argued before the Supreme court and I, I, excuse me, I accumulated a lot of the skills and confidence that I would need to become an entrepreneur, which is what I’m doing now. So that survival job had a tidbit of momentum in it, in that being part of a startup was an opportunity that ended up giving me a lot of chances to do things that I wouldn’t have gotten in a big ongoing concern.

Mindy Thomas:

Well that is a really interesting twist how you pivoted from that survival job into being an entrepreneur. And we have to take a short break. Dina, we’re going to come back and talk about what you offer in your private practice right now to your clients who they are, that niche that you have. I know that I read on your website that you teach lawyers what they didn’t learn in law school. We’ll be right back. We’ll take a short break. How do I look? Do I look good? I to play hard. My nails done once a month. I want, I want, I want a home, I guess learner mood. Last year, more than 30,000 companion animals came to us without home. 20,000 of them were feed lines. Let’s make some home.

Mindy Thomas:

Hi everybody. We are back at career chat with Dena Lefkowitz from achievement by design. She is a powerhouse attorney, a former litigator, if you will, who turned into an entrepreneur and she has a private boutique coaching practice based out immediate Pennsylvania, but she works nationwide. Welcome back everybody. Dena, we still have some tips and tricks for our job hunters out there. Let’s get right back to that. What else would you like to recommend right now?

Dena Leftkowitz:

The first thing is your resume has to be able to survive the applicant tracking program. And many people aren’t aware of that. If you’ve ever heard a commercial for zip recruiter, it talks about their fabulous matching technology and how they scan thousands of resumes and minutes to find the perfect match. And what that means is human beings are not reading your resume. Computers are so you either you have to become familiar with the applicant tracking system or you have to hire a certified resume writer. Who is because here’s an example. I have a friend who is in a very unique area. Not many people do what she does. She was invited to apply for a job I, a friend of hers, and a few weeks later he asked her why she never replied. Well, she did apply, but her resume didn’t make it through the applicant tracking system, even though she was perfect for the job and had been invited to apply. So it’s very important that your resume past the applicant tracking system and you have to be prepared to adapt your resume for every single job you applied for so that it has those matching words in it. It’s costing you to go through.

Mindy Thomas:

Customization is key. And as many of you know, I am a certified professional resume writer and the trick is, is to really read the job postings like their recipes. That’s how I read a job, posting underlining the keywords, the competencies and the requirements, and then inserting them in your resume to make you look like you were made for that job. Okay, Dena, great, great recommendation. Next point.

Dena Leftkowitz:

That’s perfect. I love the recipe, the recipe. Okay. On LinkedIn, give recommendations, give endorsements, ask for recommendations and endorsements, post information that’s relevant to your industry. Comment meaningfully on other people’s content. Engage recruiters. Spend a lot of time on LinkedIn. Look at your connections and their connections. You can explore your connections on LinkedIn and create a spreadsheet and determine who you want to connect with and engage with. Now, make introductions, ask for introductions, and always curate, create thought leadership. People want to see that you are engaged with the industry that you’re serving. I love all everybody, you know a crisis is a get out of jail free free card for somebody that you haven’t, that you’ve been meaning to call and having to coach people on marketing or or jobs. They’ll say, Oh, you know, a month went by and I was supposed to follow up on that and I didn’t do it and now it’s too late. And that’s the fallacy. It’s not too late then. And particularly in a pandemic, it’s a time to call, connect with people, see how they’re doing. It’s the best time in some ways to reach out and really make a meaningful contact with.

Mindy Thomas:

I love the get out of free jail card right now that you can call someone, but let’s walk it back to LinkedIn for one second. People like posts on LinkedIn, but when we talk about engagement specifically, what do you mean? When someone needs to engage rather than just like the comment?

Dena Leftkowitz:

One of my pet peeves on LinkedIn is when someone posts an article and they don’t say why they’re just posting it. Well, what am I supposed to think about that? Is it something you like cause it’s something you hated is something you agree with. So I look for content that is specific to the industry. I serve lawyers and it’s specific to what I do coaching, helping people overcome mindsets, helping them become more confident. So I’m always looking for content that’s interesting and relevant to the people I want to engage with. And when I introduce it, that’s the key word. I introduced the content by saying something about it. Here’s an article about such and such that I found to be interesting or make it snappier than that. Here’s some tips on how to get a new job in this economy. Yes. Excellent.

Mindy Thomas:

Excellent.

Dena Leftkowitz:

So say something about what you’re posting. Don’t just post it and then comment on what other people are posting in a meaningful and relevant way.

Mindy Thomas:

I even sometimes I don’t know people that are getting promoted, but I will like that, that particular content and then I will write, I won’t even use the pre formed. Congratulations. I will write something else in the box just because I’m happy for them. I’m glad that they got promoted. I’m glad they landed, especially in the middle of Corona. So I do agree with them.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Great tip. Mindy, don’t let LinkedIn write your message.

Mindy Thomas:

Yeah, no, I love how it’s all populated right now and it’s just like, that’s pretty clean. That’s pretty cool. Dena, you spent many years in law. You were you majored in, in English. I know that. I want to first ask you why to go to law school. Why did you pick law where your parents, lawyers?

Dena Leftkowitz:

No, my parents weren’t lawyers. I was the youngest of five and the first to go to college, I put myself through college. I was the kid who always wanted more. I got my first job when I was 10 years old. My family didn’t have a lot of money and when I graduated from college with my English degree, of course I wasn’t really that marketable. And so I thought about what could I do where I would make good money and have status and I thought the lawyer doctor, those were the two professions that I knew about and I didn’t have any interest in being a doctor. So I went to law school. I think this is really important for people to understand. I didn’t even know myself until I was in my thirties and by then I was already a lawyer. I’m not crazy about conflict. I don’t even like to send food back in a restaurant. And here I was a litigator in conflict every day. So in some ways Monday I sent myself to prison and I spent many years figuring out a way to get out of it.

Mindy Thomas:

Oh my. Oh my. You know, it must have been really scary to jump into your own business. You started achievement by design, your boutique coaching firm in what year was that? When did you

Dena Leftkowitz:

Well I started it in 2009 and I was still, I was still a full time lawyer at that point and I started at part time. Well first I went to coaching school. Let me, let me just take you back a little bit. In 2008, I had this turning point moment where I was 20 years in. I couldn’t face another 20 years of, but just like when I graduated from college, I still had no idea what I wanted to do. So I began a period of discernment. I started looking at my values, what was important to me, listening to what people said I was good at and I was searching. So one day I was volunteering at an event and a stranger was telling me his problems as used to always happen to me and still does. And I was listening and asking questions. And he turned to me and said, you know what?

Dena Leftkowitz:

You would make a great life coach. And I said, but I don’t have any credentials for that, which is the typical diminishing response when someone suggests something to you. But it stuck, stuck in my head and I decided I would look into it. And I asked for an informational interview with a professional coach who graciously spent several hours with me talking about the profession. Not many people would do that, and by the time I was done with that, I knew that that was what I wanted to do. However, I still had to make a living. So I enrolled in coaching school. I went, I did that while I was still practicing law. And while I was still practicing law, I started my business and I called it achievement by design because achievement doesn’t happen by default. Only by design. Great. I coach people part time for six years before I really started full time. My coaching does not. And that was in 2015

Mindy Thomas:

Fantastic. It’s a great story and it’s you’ve had a fabulous career even though as an attorney you weren’t so it, it seemed like you enjoyed it though.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Well, here’s the thing and I, and this is another thing I think is really important. I made a couple of steps within the field of law that made practicing law so much more powerful to me. My first real career pivot was taking a job at a general practice firm instead of a litigation firm there. I got the opportunity to do some different things that I hadn’t done before including school law. That led to a job at the school district of Philadelphia and that was a huge improvement for me. I felt like I was buying my life back. I worked with a career coach myself at that point and he was helping me explore my values and what was important to me. I took a $15,000 pay cut when I went to the school district of Philadelphia and I was happy to do it because I was going to be doing work. That was interesting with people that with academics and all sorts of interesting administrators, I was going to be helping people with problems and I was, I was happy to take the pay cut at that time because as I said earlier, sometimes when you’re pivoting you need to side or take a step backwards because you don’t start out at the top when you’re pivoting. Within five years I was making a lot more money. I was known in my field and it was a career rebirth for me.

Mindy Thomas:

Wonderful. Hey Dean, and let me ask you this. It seems that the information interview that you reached out to that, that particular coach, just to find out more about what does it mean to be a coach, how did you get that and how does one go about securing an information interview?

Dena Leftkowitz:

I was lucky in my case, a lawyer I had worked for had a wife who was a coach and I called her butt in. But I had also done informational interviews with complete strangers when I was still a lawyer practicing law and miserable, really miserable. I mean, I used to cry on Sunday nights and here’s a tip. If you’re miserable, you’re meant for something else. If you’re miserable, you’re meant for something else.

Mindy Thomas:

Wow. Well, there’s a lot of career dissatisfaction in the legal industry and as you know, I was a patent recruiter for a couple of years and I used to talk to many people about the dissatisfaction I would see. And there’s a lot of underemployment. I mean, as a legal recruiter, I was making more money than attorneys. Like, are you kidding? Really? but let’s talk about your practice right now and the types of clients that you have, who, who would hire you? What kind of person, what, what’s going on in their life?

Dena Leftkowitz:

My work generally divides into three buckets and it’s, and it’s all the things that we don’t learn in school, how to get business. They don’t teach you that in law school. And in fact, most lawyers don’t even focus on that until they’re five, six, maybe even 10 years into their practice. And at that point, it’s a new habit that they have to cultivate somehow. So I help, I help lawyers develop a marketing plan and implement that. I also help them acquire the skills necessary to lead executive presence, confidence, managing others. And the third bucket is managing your career successfully. In my view, it’s never about getting the next job, if what makes sense for my career, let me look down the chess board and see where I am now, where I want to be and what might get me there. And it might be necessary to take a side step, a pivot and interim position to acquire skills that you need to move on.

Mindy Thomas:

Well it seems like you have this trifecta. You have those analytical and legal skills that allow you to dissect, you have this common sense and very practical mindset and at the time you are a strategist. You are a big picture thinker and highly intuitive and I’ve got to hand it to you have just made a tremendous success of achievement by design and it’s just a beautiful transition out of a career where you were so happily employed but you developed all the skillsets. You know Oprah and I know some people aren’t big fans. I am. I happened to be, she always said that what you’re doing right now will prepare you for the future. It will prepare you for the next chapter. You may not know what that chapter looks like until years later and I think that you agree Dena, that that

Dena Leftkowitz:

Exactly, absolutely agree with that. That is, that’s a huge point you just made there, Mindy, because it’s not like I sat there in 2008 and figured out everything that was going to happen. I took it one step at a time. What makes sense for me right now? What might lead me in the direction that I want to go? What are people saying I’m good at and what do I love? What’s important to me? That’s probably the most important question you can ever ask yourself. Because our values are why we do everything in life. And when you’re in a position that isn’t aligned with your values, that’s going to bring misery. That’s going to bring the Sunday night blues.

Mindy Thomas:

Yes, yes. And when you’re not using the skills that you love, well that’s the perfect storm. Having a values conflict and having a skills conflict that is in fact the perfect storm. So I think that you were using in CR, you know the skills you loved, but you were in the wrong environment. Right? And I mean you were very successful as a litigator. I and I still can’t get over. You’re the kind of person that doesn’t send food back in the restaurant. That’s really,

Dena Leftkowitz:

I had a, I had an orientation toward the work that I would strap on my armor and go in and do the job and then fall apart afterwards.

Mindy Thomas:

Oh my goodness. Dana, Dana. So what other kinds of clients do you work with besides attorneys?

Dena Leftkowitz:

I also have a fair number of accountants and auditors that I work with and there’s some similarities. They’re both professional service providers. They both have to be superior technicians. They both have a lot of regulatory issues in their, in their work and they have to balance being a technician with being an entrepreneur. And I also have coached a best selling author who had her book published and did very well and a smattering of executives that are either making a career move or want to up level their leadership or executive skills. Yes.

Mindy Thomas:

[Inaudible] Dena, it is just been such a pleasure to have you on the show today. Tell my audience how they can find you if they’re interested in working with you. And I’m sure you’ve got a COVID19 discount because we all do right now. How do they find you?

Dena Leftkowitz:

My company is called achievement by design, so that’s achievement by design.com and you can also see my articles and the legal Intelligencer and thrive global. And I’d love to hear from you and I’d love to help you with your career.

Mindy Thomas:

Thank you so much Dena. It’s been, it’s again, it’s been a real pleasure.

Dena Leftkowitz:

Thanks very much.

Mindy Thomas:

Oh you are, you’re welcome. In closing, I’d like to reach out and, and really a shout out to the medical field for their service and sacrifice as well as the essential workers. And I do wish everyone a happy and safe week with their loved ones. We’ll see you next week. Nice job.

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Dena Leftkowtiz appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-leftkowtiz/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Mike McCarthy https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-mike-mccarthy https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-mike-mccarthy#respond Thu, 30 Apr 2020 21:27:25 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=892 Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she talks with her guest, Mike McCarthy, former two-time Olympian, Hall of Fame and World Cyclist about his recent layoff from his position.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Mike McCarthy appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Mike McCarthy

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Mike McCarthy

Join Mindy Thomas, host of Career Chat as she talks with her guest, Mike McCarthy, former two-time Olympian, Hall of Fame and World Cyclist about his recent layoff from his position.

Mindy Thomas :
Hi everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas and this is Career Chat, which airs every Monday at 1130 and Tuesday at 8:00 PM. If you need a little pep in your step today and a little bit of inspiration, you want to stay tuned to the show today. We have a very special guest. I’m very honored and privileged to bring in Mike McCarthy from Southern California. Good morning Mike. How are you?

Mike McCarthy:
I’m great.

Mindy Thomas :
We know your beaches are open and people are going crazy down there in Southern California?

Mike McCarthy:
Yeah. And meanwhile you know, many of us are still fighting for spaces in our own homes, but but yeah, that people are definitely out and about a little bit more this last few days.

Mindy Thomas :
Well, I’m really happy to introduce my audience to you today. You are you’ve had a fabulous career and let me begin with, you are a two time Olympian champ. You had a world, also a world championship, 17 national titles. You were inducted into the United States cycling world, a hall of fame, if you will. And I’ve been impressed with, you know, your Olympic awards, bronze and gold medals and as well as how you reinvented yourself time and time again, and you find yourself in a new chapter today that’s along with 24 million Americans that are unemployed and as a result of your company reorganizing, your position was eliminated. Before we go there, Mike, I’d like you to talk about your career as a competitive athlete. You live the dream. It was an incredible run during those years. You retired at the age of 30 as a world cyclist. Bring us back. I know you’re a New York guy originally from Brooklyn. Tell us a little bit about you.

Mike McCarthy:
Well, it’s, it’s funny because when you mentioned those things, I sort of do a double take, like, wow, is that me and my lifetime? And I tend to be someone who thinks that, that you know, the fun is in front of me and not behind me, but it was an amazing run and I was super fortunate particularly growing up in New York city to find my passion, which, you know, was a bit of an with cycling a bit of an anomaly in New York city but right place at the right time as everyone knows, the city is so amazing, crossroads of culture. And so folks from Europe, central South America brought cycling culture with them. There was an amazing community there. And I tagged on to that and sort of Parley that into a really nice 17 year run. And it’s like when you mentioned I, I retired at 30. That was that was not a hard choice at that point. AF after the run I’d had but amazing memories and, and despite both my parents protests you know, I think I really did pursue my passion and live the dream, so fantastic experience. But you know, as, as I mentioned earlier, more to come,

Mindy Thomas :
What’s it take to become a world champion and make it to the Olympics. There are so many people that haven’t made it, that have worked their whole lives. What is it that

Mike McCarthy:
It’s just some of the parts I, you know, you can say it’s talent. You can say it’s the work. You can say it’s the dedication, but it’s all those things and it’s frankly a lot of luck as well. And a lot of stick to it. A miss if you, if you quit, you have no chance. So for me it was just getting back in day after day and, and some of the days are sunny and some aren’t as sunny. You know, cherishing the great results and the great experiences. And, and, you know, moving past the ones that didn’t live up to your expectations. I think for me you know, I, I was pretty ambitious when I was, I still am, but I, in terms of my cycling goals, I was ambitious to a point where you know, early in my career I was mocked for, you know, for, for being forward with my goals. And I said, when I was 15 years old and I wanted to be world champion,

Mindy Thomas :
Oh my goodness.

Mike McCarthy:
And everybody looked at me and said, well, you know, this fat kid from New York says he wants to be a world champion. That’s really funny. And nine years later I realized that dream. So it was a good run, filled with tons and tons of great lessons that I’ve continued to hold, hold with me and they’re my principles of how I live every single day.

Mindy Thomas :
Your ability to visualize and move forward. Did you, as we hear Olympic athletes visualize winning over and over and over again, is that every day,

Mike McCarthy:
Single day? Yeah, it was, it was it was visualizing the goal and, and, you know, applying work to that visualization. And for me it was, it was oftentimes my digitalization was, was, was not winning. And the fear of not winning propelled me to, to push myself harder. I like to say that, that I wasn’t necessarily the hardest worker, but I tried to work smarter than other people and I, I am the consummate opportunist. If you leave me the smallest opening through the hole and, and that’s, that’s how I, that’s how I, I built my career.

Mindy Thomas :
You don’t come from a family of athletes,

Mike McCarthy:
Right? You know, my, my parents my, my mom’s an academic and, and, and my, you know, my dad worked on wall street and they both played sports when they were kids. Neither of them really understood cycling, nor did they approve of my pursuit of athletic excellence. They would’ve both preferred Sydney to go to school and take a kind of, you know, the standard path through life. And there’s risk in that, right? In hindsight, I’m really glad I did it the way I did it, but at the same time, if it had gone wrong, it could have gone really wrong. So

Mike McCarthy:
Again, that’s where the luck comes into play.

Mindy Thomas :
Well, what’s interesting and what struck me about your background was you had reinvented yourself several times over and after you retired from your career as a professional athlete, you then moved into wall street. I didn’t know your dad was on wall street, so you took your love of finance and went 16 years on wall street. Can you tell us a little bit about that career?

Mike McCarthy:
Yeah. So when I decided that I wanted to be, to be done with bike racing, I had a year left on my contract, but I sat down and I made a list of of what I saw as opportunities. And some of those opportunities are cultivated through my years in cycling. Others are just things that I thought would be kind of cool ways to spend, you know, the next chapter of my life. As it turns out, I had a close relationship with Tom wiser, who at the time was, was the, the chairman of Montgomery securities. And Tom had always told me that when I was finished bike racing might be a great great addition to his trading desk. And so I called them on it a year before I was ready to retire and, and flew to San Francisco from New York, did interviews and found a nice home for myself there.

Mike McCarthy:
It was a massive segue, but it also put me into what I like to call the most dynamic, repetitive environment or environment that you can find. It’s, it can be really exciting, but it’s essentially the same job day in and day out. And it took me 16 years to then, you know, reinvent myself again, make another transition. But what I found during that 16 years is that I liked to build things. I don’t necessarily love the steady state work if it’s the same day in and day out. So everything’s a learning experience, but that was a great one. Something that, again, I, I don’t regret doing it at all, but the following chapter certainly suited me. I think to a T

Mindy Thomas :
That was an interesting blend of you’re cycling the third career that you have a blend of cycling and finance. It converged. And you began working for a startup in Southern California called [inaudible] Z. W I F T. Tell us what they do and how do it

Mike McCarthy:
Yeah, completely pragmatic decision at, you know, four years old to leave a perfectly good career at 45 years old. So we were proving to be a career on wall street, you know, making a nice wage with two kids and a dog and yeah, I’m going to go work for a startup.

Mike McCarthy:
Again, did not get family approval or parental approval on that one. But I, when I saw the product I was, I was close with the CEO, Eric men. We brought up by grace and together and Eric had, had shut down transitioned how to a FinTech startup that he built and was starting his, his, his next company, which was with, and he came out to pitch knee for for friends and family round. And I said, well, you know, if, if, if, if you want my money, you go speak to my ex wife, but if you want me, I’m ready to make this transition. And, and so he, he sorta thought about it and he said, you know, you’d actually be great in our team. You have credibility within the cycling industry. You know, how to roll your sleeves up, your goal oriented. I think you can help help us move our project forward. And so within the period of a couple of months, I left wall street and started at, at you know, a company with 10 employees. And, and it was just from end to end, an amazing experience.

Mindy Thomas :
That’s a virtual online app that’s geared towards runners and cyclist. It’s a video game, right?

Mike McCarthy:
It is. It, it’s, it’s what Peloton is to the fitness. The fitness crowd it is with, as to the competitive, busiest cyclist and runner. And you know, we, we call it a game. It’s, it’s really a training and racing platform an opportunity for people to interact together. Basically bringing the best of outdoor running and cycling indoors. Which you know right now is, is, is massively helpful to, to the millions of people that are stuck inside their homes.

Mindy Thomas :
The toolkit that you took with you from wall street and from your professional athletic career, what did that look like? What was in it?

Mike McCarthy:
You know, at the end of the day, I think for me it was, it was just, you know, the ability to make good, quick, intuitive decisions and validate them obviously through, you know, through data, through, you know, just kind of test testing scenarios. But it was, it was really, I think the one core competency that, that allowed me to do that job well was my ability to communicate with people and speak anyone’s language. Not literally, but figuratively speaking. It was, you know, my role in business development development and Swift was more of, of an evangelist. It was my job to go out and, and, you know, authenticate the products with the endemic, the endemic brands. And then also to take it outside of cycling and running and show it to people to, to, to build a business case for us. And it ended up being massively successful.

Mindy Thomas :
Mike, you must have one heck of a Rolodex from your early days across industries, across every kind of industry. I can imagine that’s, that helped you in that role in business development. Did it? Not

Mike McCarthy:
Without a doubt, but interestingly enough, I mean, I, I was a bike racer before the internet. So you know, many of those contexts I’ve had to reconnect with. And, and you know, the digital age with the digital age, but you know, on LinkedIn or wherever. But I’ve never had to apply for a job and I’ve never really had to have a resume. So the process I’m going through now is completely new territory and I’m having to go out and, and not rebuild bridges, but, but find people that I’ve, I would previously connect to that I may not have spoken to in quite some time.

Mindy Thomas :
Well, you have a get out of jail free card right now because everyone is calling people from years ago. It’s just amazing. I heard from a friend from 40 years ago and another friend from 25 years ago, people are picking up the phone right now. You know, we’re all in it together and I think that we’re sensing that, that connection you know, we, we need to connect with that said, the ability to find people. It’s pretty easy, isn’t it?

Mike McCarthy:
Absolutely. and if there’s a silver lining to the whole pandemic you know, among other things, it’s, it’s the amount of communication that’s happening, right? And it’s conversations. It’s not email, it’s not texts. It’s actually picking up the phone. And you know, spending these occasionally massive amounts of time with people that you would never, ever have that opportunity to do. In, in normal circumstances. So look, I, you know, I guess misery loves company, but it’s, it’s hard to feel bad about being laid off in this environment when there are so many other folks. We’re in the same boat with you. So it really, I guess in a way it doesn’t feel out of the ordinary at all to me.

Mindy Thomas :
I think when you see it coming, ah, that’s a different place. I think that’s a different place for people. When you’re sort of blindsided, that’s another place where you land.

Mike McCarthy:
Yeah. I mean, I’d be lying if I didn’t say I was disappointed. You know, to, to, to have the position eliminated and to not be able to rehome myself within the company. You know, at the end of the day, I love the product. I love the people that I work with. I’ll consider them family for life regardless of whether I’m at the company or not. But you move on, right? It’s, I’m not going to sit there and cry about it and think, Oh, you know, the only place I want to work is back at the company where I, where I left. It’s, there’s a big world out there. And, and amazingly enough, I’m a couple of weeks in and I’ve had some unbelievably great calls with folks. You know, that, that may or may not need help, but it just, there’s a feeling out there that there’s, there’s a tremendous amount of opportunity if you know where to look.

Mindy Thomas :
Sure, sure. And your role there was as vice president of the running product division,

Mike McCarthy:
But that was my final role. I, I started basically in the partnerships VP of partnerships and then moved on to a business development role, building that function at the company. And then and then worked my way into, into the, the head of the running product. But startups evolve. They go from, from built to survive to build, to succeed. They go from generalist, a generalist environment who’s specialists environments and, and you know, at a certain point the, the roll your sleeves up generalists are marginalized and, and don’t really add as much as they did in the beginning.

Mindy Thomas :
Mike, hold that thought. We’ve got to take a short break. We’ll be right back for sure.

Speaker 3:
Today’s show is sponsored by dr Jacquelyn. Take charge of your life personally, financially and professionally. There’s a dr jacqueline.com to book an appointment today.

Speaker 4:
The session that we had with the cat was really entertaining and enlightening. We were able to put together some very specific steps that we as individuals can take and it was really fun to all come together and see sort of where we’re going as a team and how we can all get there together.

Speaker 5:
We had a tremendous experience with the beat cap partners. One of the challenges that we have as an organization is to make sure that we have the right people in the right chairs doing the right thing. To do that well, you have to have synergy. You can try to dream up ways to make sure that your group does that or you can rely on experts. We would recommend BK partners to anybody who is looking to take their organization to the next level.

Speaker 6:
[Inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible]

Mindy Thomas :
Hi everybody. We’re back with Mike McCarthy who is a two time Olympian, a world champion, a hall of Famer in the cycling world, was 17 national championships. He’s powerhouse and he’s had an incredible career. We’ve talked about his career as an Olympian on wall street and now he is among the 24, 27 million Americans who’s facing a new chapter. We talked also during break about going dark, going down the rabbit hole and how that’s not an option for him. Mike, let us walk through like what you do to keep yourself above board here because as you know, people can go down that rabbit hole, get into the head trash and not move from their chair all day because they’re worried just worried to death about their future. How do you look at it?

Mike McCarthy:
Well, the new chapters are amazing, right? Like it’s an opportunity for reinvention to do something you’ve always wanted to do to change the scenery a little bit to keep things fresh. But their whole are better when they’re self-inflicted. I think for the, you know, as you mentioned, millions of us who, who’ve been displaced from, from our jobs. It, it’s definitely, you know, it’s, it’s a little bit of a SmackDown and it didn’t lead me to go dark. I think for me it’s, it’s, it’s continuing to push things forward. It’s having conversations with as many folks as I can. I, I have a couple of folks that, that I can just air things out with. If I start getting really down. But you also, the flip side of that is you also have to be careful because, you know, I’ve, I’ve been on so many calls in the last couple of weeks where I think, wow, that sounds like an amazing opportunity and then I have to take a step back and think, well, was it really amazing or was it just something that, you know, fit the bill right now that ordinarily I would consider like, okay, that, that turned into amazing because of the current situation.

Mike McCarthy:
So I think, I think being able to take a step back, you know, taking a breath once in a while not feeling like there’s, there’s a massive amount of pressure. It is a luxury but also something that’s, that’s, that’s really good to develop. If you can

Mindy Thomas :
Do you work out every day, I would imagine you do. Are you a cyclist or runner? Do you do both? What, what are you looking at like an early morning, cause you’re in Southern California. I think it’s getting really hot out there right now.

Mike McCarthy:
It is. I try to stay active. You know, working in such close proximity to a refrigerator is not a good thing for me. And so I tend to feel better when I move a little bit or I, I get the endorphins going. So I’m fortunate I have a great home fitness set up. I also have pretty good access to outdoor recreation here, so I throw on a mask and go for a rider, bike rider, a runner you know, just take the dogs around the block or something. But I tend to think that’s a great place to clear my head. And something that I try to make part of my fabric every day.

Mindy Thomas :
What about visualization? Like you used it back in the day, I mean, when you’re 15 years old, you said, I’m going to be a world champion. I, I also assume that you said that I’m going to go to the Olympics. Did you say for sure. Oh, okay.

Mike McCarthy:
And you know, it’s, it’s, it’s interesting in sport because you know, you, you can say those things and there’s a point in your athletic career where you start to, you know, understand whether or not those things are in reach or not. With, you know, with, with, with rehoming yourself into workplace and, you know, finding a new job, right? It’s can be it can be a little bit different. I could put a goal on the wall and say, I, you know, I want to get a job that, that checks these 10 boxes. But you might have to be willing to sacrifice half of those at this point in time or things may just take longer than you’d want them to. So it’s a process. And I think fortunately from, from my background in athletics I I’m very process driven and understand that the need to be true to that and, and that things don’t always happen in a linear fashion. So for me, I’ll take the good days with the bad and hopefully the good days outweigh the bad days or outnumber them. So

Mindy Thomas :
That’s terrific. That’s a great attitude. And you know, I’m wondering if you, you, if you write your goals down. We know that adults that write goals down, I actually, you know, their thoughts or journal they crystallize their thoughts and from that insight comes have you been journaling? Do you write down you know, two week goals, six months goals? Are you looking at that kind of exercise to help you along at this time?

Mike McCarthy:
I, well, yes and no. So I’m fairly disciplined in my Workday, but I’m also I also, I used to respect the ebb and flow of, of, you know, my, my own moods, right? If, if I’m in a good mood, I know I can, I can step on the gas a little bit instead of, you know, I can do an extra hour or two at the end of the day or I can start earlier when I jumped out of bed and I’m excited. I’ll take advantage of those things. But if I feel like I’m sitting there banging my head against the wall and I’m not making progress, I’m not afraid to get up and walk away from it.

Mindy Thomas :
Ah.

Mike McCarthy:
In terms of, of, you know, the writing one thing I did do is make a list of companies that I admired, not necessarily companies that I th I specifically want to work for it, but I admire them for their products, for their ethos to their, for their brand presence, for their mission, et cetera. And, and that’s really helped me align in my own my own job search. Again, not in necessarily wanting to work for those specific companies, but about really channeling those principles into my, my next role. So mission is something that’s particularly important to me. You know, coming from is whipped. We had an amazing mission to make more people more active, more often. I love that it’s good for people, it’s healthy. You know, and it’s something that, that, that I can really relate to. So, you know, when I, I, I mean, I think, you know, a company like Tesla is amazing. I think I didn’t, you know, Nike is an iconic brand. I think Apple makes amazing products. Again, places that I, I would, I would, I’d like to work at, but if not those companies, then companies that share some of the same values and, and you know, kind of work in the same ways.

Mindy Thomas :
That’s really interesting. Mike, I, I’m curious about whether when I go back to the Olympic training and the professional career, did you ever think you would lose, I mean, right now, are you taking that kind of training again? Are you applying it to your everyday? Like, I’m going to land, I’m going to find a great company that has a mission, I can get behind. Are you saying those things to yourself?

Mike McCarthy:
I I wouldn’t say them to anyone else. I, you know, I think, I think that comes from self-confidence. It doesn’t necessarily need to be shared. But the nice thing is that with, with, with social media and, you know, with my, my network, I’m hearing them from other people. And that gives me a lot of confidence and that’s the only place I need to hear those things from my community.

Mindy Thomas :
Very, that’s great. Mike, we have to close in just a minute. Do you have anything that you could convey to our audience today? Because you’re in the same boat as a lot of people, millions of Americans you have any parting words for them?

Mike McCarthy:
When I when I left whiffed my, my initial reaction was to, to, to just go full gas into a job search and, and then I realized after, after not making much progress in the first few days that I needed to take a step back and make sure that I had all the pieces in place to make that journey possible. I hired an amazing resume writer, Mindy Thomas. No shame, no shame. It, it, it saved that year. And, and and really, you know, when I, I, I sort of outsource the things that I wasn’t particularly good at which allowed me to focus on the things I was good at. And then I took it step by step. And, and now I’m in a place where I’m confident if somebody says, shoot your resume over that I have something to send to them.

Mike McCarthy:
I understand my strengths. I you know, painfully self aware of my weaknesses. And I’m in a much, much better place to do the search. So I would say if there was one piece of advice you know, don’t, don’t push on the string, just give it a second. Right. And, and, and make sure that you’re in a good place to do it. People see right through you if you’re not in a good place. And that is not a position of strength and in this environment you have to put yourself in a position of strength.

Mindy Thomas :
Well, Mike, thank you. That is great advice. I love it. Thank you so much for being available to talk with us today to our viewing audience, especially to our, our healthcare professionals are first responders are essential workers. Thank you for your service and sacrifice to everyone else. Have a happy and safe week. With your loved ones. We’ll see you here next week.

Mike McCarthy:
Excellent.

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Mike McCarthy appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-mike-mccarthy/feed 0
Mindy Thomas Interviews Meg McGinn, President/Founder of Osprey Health https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-meg-mcginn-president-founder-of-osprey-health https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-meg-mcginn-president-founder-of-osprey-health#respond Thu, 30 Apr 2020 20:30:10 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=756 Hi everybody. I'm Mindy Thomas and this is Career Chat, which airs every Monday at 11:30 AM and Tuesday nights at 8:00 PM the numbers of unemployed Americans are staggering and sadly people are losing their jobs, their income, and some are losing their health insurance. So if you're one of those folks sitting on the sidelines today, please stay tune because my next guest is an expert in healthcare consulting. In fact, I hired her and I used her for my own health care needs. Her name is Meg McGinn of Osprey Health.

The post Mindy Thomas Interviews Meg McGinn, President/Founder of Osprey Health appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Mindy Thomas Interviews Meg McGinn, President/Founder of Osprey Health

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Meg McGinn, President/Founder of Osprey Health

Mindy Thomas:
Hi everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas and this is Career Chat, which airs every Monday at 11:30 AM and Tuesday nights at 8:00 PM the numbers of unemployed Americans are staggering and sadly people are losing their jobs, their income, and some are losing their health insurance. So if you’re one of those folks sitting on the sidelines today, please stay tune because my next guest is an expert in healthcare consulting. In fact, I hired her and I used her for my own health care needs. Her name is Meg McGinn of Osprey Health. Joining us right here right now is Meg. Welcome to the show. Meg. I’m so excited you’re here today.

Meg McGinn:
Thank you for having me, Mindy. It’s always a pleasure to see you and I really appreciate the opportunity to join you today regarding this very important subject.

Mindy Thomas:
Yes, COVID 19 has impacted individuals as well as employers. And there is a huge, there’s so much information out there, Meg. So we really need to help folks today understand what they need to know right now. What is fact, what is fiction? So let’s get right to it. What do individuals need to know that have been laid off and furloughed cause there’s a difference between being laid off and furloughed and then there’s the whole group of people sitting on the edge waiting for the boom to drop. Tell us what we need to know.

Meg McGinn:
You’re absolutely right. So just to start out with the difference between being furloughed and laid off actually can come down to a simply as whether you have been able to keep your benefits or have the, if the company has really terminated you know, employment as well as benefits. The benefits need to be really a bridge between that differential. If you are furloughed right now, you most likely might have a little job uncertainty but your benefits are intact. The employers are working hard to keep that employer sponsored healthcare in place as long as they possibly can and we can get to their options later on in the interview. But most importantly, let’s talk about those that have been laid off. Unfortunately this is occurring more rapidly. The numbers are increasing week by week. What individuals need to know is they have options. There is a federal mandate regarding Cobra employers required to offer employees Cobra for up to 18 months.

Meg McGinn:
And employees will have the option of continuing the current healthcare they have the health insurance they have, but at a rate of almost a hundred, 2% times. So the premium they’re carrying the majority of the premium and even at administrative fee if they elect Cobra, the alternative is one that people don’t know about as much as they should. And that is the ACA, the affordable care act in place, the individual marketplace. This is something that an individual can elect within 30 days of loss of coverage. They also can qualify for a tax credit and sometimes that tax credit can be up to a hundred percent of the monthly premium. I like to tell people it’s very important. Then the wording on healthcare.gov is their projected income for 2020. That’s what the individual has to evaluate. What is your projected income looking like?

Meg McGinn:
And it is uncertain times. We don’t know. So many more individuals do qualify for this tax premium. And in most cases, the marketplace plans are as good as what the employer sponsored plans we’re offering as well. So it’s a wonderful way for an individual to keep their costs down and their budgets down. The important piece, Mindy, that people don’t realize and employers don’t know to educate their employees on, is that if an individual elects Cobra, then they automatically become ineligible for the marketplace and that tax credit. So before they elect Cobra, it is really important for them to evaluate would they qualify for a tax credit and what are their options on the marketplace because they will not be available and eligible for the marketplace until open enrollment in November. So they’re gonna be paying 102% of their premiums for the remainder of the year. And for us right now that those are staggering numbers.

Mindy Thomas:
Meg, let me ask you this. How long do we have to decide whether we’re going to choose Cobra or choose an alternative plan? So say I get laid off today, April 21st, I guess it is around there. How long do I have?

Meg McGinn:
You have 30 days to elect an individual plan, you have 60 days to elect a Cobra plan. So it’s very important to when you get laid off to first consider what are my options on the individual marketplace. And that’s where we, and also the health can help. We evaluate the individuals needs for them and their family members and then make sure the providers, their access to care is almost as seamless as what they had. And let’s talk about that tax credit and if it could apply to them in that case as it does, but it might not, it might not be the alternative for everybody.

Mindy Thomas:
When you say evaluate a family’s needs, can you break down what that means?

Meg McGinn:
Yes.

Mindy Thomas:
I mean, we all, we have situations where we have a spouse and we have some children, dependents that all might have different health needs. Might, one might have a chronic condition, one might be having really a need of mental health support in some capacity. Some might just have a prescription drug maintenance drug that they need and they may need a very specific brand. You know, these very oral provider that they need, they, they’ve gone through all these specialists and this specialist understands them the best, you know, those little tiny things to, you know, the big picture is really important for that family member who you know, they want the access of care to stay the same. They want it to be consistent. And, and in this time it’s important to evaluate, let’s look at your providers. Let’s make sure everybody’s in there.

Mindy Thomas:
So your access to care is the same. Ultimately can come down just as siblings costs, you know if we have the privilege of choosing between you know, a provider a brand or a generic and all that terrific, but you know, in this time you know, it really comes down to premium as well. You can get your premium offset by tax credit. You know, it’s a significant piece of the pie with your expertise in health care consulting. I know you’re a voracious reader. You have to be, how do you stay up with all the information, all the regulations? Today it’s, it’s just seems unfathomable to me to get, to get a handle on that. How do you do that?

Meg McGinn:
Well, thank you. But that’s my job, you know, I mean we, when we go to the doctor, we expect the doctor to give us sound advice, you know, on whatever ill ailment condition we might have. My job is to understand the intricacies of everything going on in, in mid 22 years. I’ve been in this industry. What has happened in the last six weeks has been mind blowing. Not only the pandemic and what, what has surrounded that pandemic, but also legislative changes. The FIC run and the cares act that have been in place. The, the carriers and what they are, are accepting like the COBIT 19 for individuals out there, anything code related is covered at a hundred percent with any credible health plan. So people shouldn’t worry that that is unheard of in the state.

Mindy Thomas:
Yeah. In fact, when you, if you have cancer and I am a survivor these things aren’t covered. You know, there’s only a certain percentage people go broke when they have cancer, but with this at 19 everything’s covered. Meg,

Meg McGinn:
From, from the telemedicine to the primary care doctor to the emergency room to the inpatient. I hope that doesn’t happen, but to the inpatient, the ventilators that you hear about us, anything related, the insurance carriers aren’t taking on that. There’s zero cost sharing, which is really important for people. They want people to go seek care as quickly as possible. And you know, to your point, if people have a high deductible plan and they think they have to pay for these things, they’re going to be more reluctant to, to go and seek the care they need.

Mindy Thomas:
This is very important information for everyone to know. So if someone is laid off or they’re furloughed, what is the first plan on, on their agenda? What’s the first plan of attack here? What do they do?

Meg McGinn:
Well, whether you call me or you call somebody like myself that can help navigate their options, the first thing you want to do is evaluate the individual marketplace. You can go to healthcare.gov you can call Osprey help you can and evaluate what are my options and do I qualify for a tax credit? That’s the first and foremost. I think most of your viewers will be very pleased to learn that they will qualify for a tax credit.

Mindy Thomas:
What distinguishes Osprey health against other health care consulting? I mean, how do you evaluate a healthcare consultant today? Do you have to have credentials? Are there certificates? Are there degrees that they should have? Because I can imagine there’s a lot of people out there right now that call themselves healthcare consultants.

Meg McGinn:
You’re right. And when you are dealing specifically with healthcare.gov you really need a very specific credentials. You need a to be federally facilitated marketplace representative and FFN representative, which is why accreditation and Uber to work and enroll individuals on the marketplace. That’s important. You know, it’s in as far as my agency, how do we differentiate? The reason I got into this business is because I really care. I really care. I’m a mother of three. I have parents that are senior citizens. I am a small business owner myself. I understand how expensive healthcare is and I understand how critical it is for people to understand how to navigate their insurance. And what we do here at Osprey health is we put wellness before insurance and I think that’s the biggest differential. We have a corporate wellness program. We educate individuals on the wellness resources within the carriers.

Meg McGinn:
We help them continue to stay, helping to keep those healthcare costs down. And there is a world of information out there, free of charge for anybody who, who’s interested in, in in learning more about it. But we also are there as a resource navigating people through these very difficult times. We help and listen. We say, what, what are your needs in your home and let’s find a plan that fits your needs throughout the year. I don’t just forget about them. I check up on them. I see how things are going. I have a team of people that do the same. Someone gets a claim that isn’t reimbursed. We investigate, we find out why we challenge and we want to just extra mile because we really care. And I would say that’s how we differentiate from, from the masses out there.

Mindy Thomas:
And Meg, the other thing is, if anyone’s looking at Medicare now, they’ve turned 65, you’re an expert in Medicare as well.

Meg McGinn:
I am. I am, you know, I like to say that I like to follow people through the years so that I help navigate all of their options with all of their healthcare needs and and part of that and what’s near and dear to me. I, I love, I love the seniors. I really do. I, I love seeing them enroll when they’re 65, but I, I have many clients in their nineties and I feel like, you know, they’re my relatives, but it is mind boggling. It’s daunting. It’s scary for so many trying to figure out what their options are and it can get very expensive. And what I think I’d like your viewers to know who might qualify for Medicare is that there are lots of options out there. Affordable options have very good healthcare. So if it’s becoming more expensive than you could afford, definitely call us because we will evaluate and help you find the best skin that fits your budgets and your healthcare needs.

Mindy Thomas:
Yes. just to walk back for a moment, when we first met you were in business for yourself doing healthcare consulting, then you decided to make a little career pivot back then into working right back into corporate, then you decided to abandon working for someone else and you landed right back into healthcare consulting. Can you explain to our viewers a little bit about that shift? Because it’s an interesting twist.

Meg McGinn:
It really is. You know, and, and I took I was in this field for a long time and then I took a career break with my children at home. And in 2010, the affordable care act was passed. And at the time there were there were rumors that employer sponsored healthcare was going away and it was going to be an individual marketplace. And I saw the need for, for people to remind her, my resources to help people, individuals navigate their healthcare. And that’s how Osprey health was born. It was to help the individual figure out how to navigate all that is out there. And I loved it. I got into that. And it was a wonderful entering back into the healthcare, but things shifted and the employment sponsored healthcare did not go away. In fact, there were many more alternatives for employers than before.

Meg McGinn:
And so I thought, you know what, maybe it’s time for me to get back into the corporate side and and, and see how I can grow my, my business that way. And once I learned, once I joined a consulting firm and I saw how they did it and that’s where I came up with this idea that, you know, it’s not about just arriving once a year and delivering a renewal. It’s about really being a real value add to that employer throughout the entire year and keep your employees healthy, educate them on wellness so that when the renewal comes, we can give them, you know, tangible information and reporting that shows that what they’ve done throughout the year and helping Pete, their environment, a healthy working place for these families and these individuals. It pays off on the back end with, with their insurance. So I would say wellness than insurance. But I found that in the broader industry out there that my attention to wellness wasn’t was their priority for so many. And that’s when I said, you know what, I’m doing it my way and I’m going to go back and Osprey health is going to start taking care of employers and taking care of people. And we’re putting wellness before insurance and that’s, that’s why I’m here today. Fantastic. Meg, hold that thought. We have to take a short break. We’ll be right back.

Mindy Thomas:
Welcome back to Career Chat. We have an expert today here with us. She specializes in healthcare consulting, Meg McGuinn from Osprey health located in the greater metropolitan area of Philadelphia, but she works nationwide. Meg, we were talking about what individuals need to know about covert 19 and the impact on themselves. Let’s talk about how you’re helping employers. What do they need to know if they’re sitting out here watching us today?

Meg McGinn:
Great question. You know, you know, we had talked about in the first segment that in the last six weeks for everyone globally, life has changed, but for the employer you know, we entered this this year soaring, you know, the economy was just doing great. The conversations I was having with employers in January were a full of excitement big plans. I mean the world was our oyster, right? And and these, these employers now that everything has, has just come tumbling down on them and we will get through it. But what I have been so impressed with, with my clients and employers out there, they care so much about their employees and they want so badly to try to hang on and do what they can to get through this and take care of their employees. It’s very impressive. Well, one of the things that I think it’s important to share with your audience is that the traditional group employer sponsored health plan that they are familiar with there are changes, there are options out there and if their broker isn’t sitting down with them right this very minute and explaining their options, then their broker is doing them a disservice.

Meg McGinn:
And I say that because there are funding options, there are planned design options, there is new legislation that just was passed four months ago that could literally transform how an employer offers health care. To give you an idea, 19 the 1970s, the 401k plans came out for employers to do the defined contribution. Well, what if I were to tell you that now that defined contribution model is now set up for healthcare for employers. The individuals go seek their own plan and the employer pays for it basically or contributes to it just like he or she would in a, in a a defined contribution four, one K plan. This is this is cutting edge. It’s, it’s brand new out there, but it will surface as a viable, wonderful option for employers dealing with very difficult budget conversations right now. So I’m talking to them about funding options.

Meg McGinn:
I’m talking to them about these new plan designs. We’re talking about you know, how to to offer alternatives. Perhaps a small business owner can you know, let their encourage their employee to participate on the individual marketplace with the tax credit. And the employer can offer some other way to contribute or raise their salary or something. Their, their, you know, their ways to get creative and employers need that resource. They need that help right now they’re dealing with a lot. And most importantly, our job is to come in and sit down and, and show them ways that they can keep their employees employed, keep that healthcare going, and then also get that wellness, keep them, you know, try to add value for their employees by offering a corporate wellness program that doesn’t really even cost that much. So many of insurance carriers offer these wellness coaches and nutritionists and, and fair pests that are free of charge. It’s all embedded into the insurance plan and we provide help educating their employees of all of these options. So that’s how I’m helping right now. You know, just, just trying to be an additional resource for them.

Mindy Thomas:
So are you working with small businesses like say one to 10 employees to fortune 500? Who’s your typical client?

Meg McGinn:
So Osby health does really well in that small to middle market. So we say as small as two employees all the way up to 800. You know, we, we do REL well in that marketplace. Because you know, what we do is it’s our attention to detail and it’s, it’s really taking care of our clients and customizing each and every client’s needs. I mean, that’s so important. We are not cookie cutter here at all. We do everything customizable and we are creative. We really want to listen. I’m a small business owner myself, just like you money, you know, I can sit down, I feel, I am stand. I understand. So we’re all about like, what is it that you need and how can we help you?

Mindy Thomas:
I know that when I hired you after you hired me years ago, I came back and hired you because I had Supreme confidence in your ability to pick and choose based on my needs or what plan. And it was so confusing. I just wanted to shut my eyes and like wake up tomorrow. It’s a nightmare to navigate. So when we’re talking about employers right now, if they’re not talking to their broker, they should be calling you because your broker has a responsibility to inform them of the funding options and the other resources that are available right now. And if they’re not staying up with the state of the art in info that’s happening out there, then they’re going to be, could they get themselves into trouble? What could that look like?

Meg McGinn:
You know, the question before in the earlier segment and it just is worth repeating. It is my job to stay on top of everything that is going on. And you know, lot of late nights reading a lot, a lot of weekends, you know, talking to my, my local representatives about what’s happening on the state level, what’s happening on the federal level, how is impacting employers. That’s my job. And that’s the job of a broker is to sit and, and really make sure that we have a pulse on what is happening at this very moment because our, our clients, they’re, they’re running their own businesses and they need us to come in. So, yeah, I mean, I would say that the very first important question the employer needs to ask is, am I getting the, the support and the resources from my broker? And if they’re not, then it’s time to reevaluate why they’re there using that individual.

Mindy Thomas:
[Inaudible] And so you work with customers or clients nationwide?

Meg McGinn:
I do. Yup. And just so you know, it varies from state to state. Healthcare is so different, let’s say in California versus down in Texas versus New York. And here the state regulations are different. It’s really important to make sure you understand what’s happening. The health systems in the different areas of the country. Very, very different. So yeah, I do that as well.

Mindy Thomas:
Well that’s interesting because like for example, if you had a new Yorkers it wanted to move to Miami and they were on Medicare or going to be on Medicare, don’t they need to know what’s happening down in Florida before they decide to move?

Meg McGinn:
Absolutely. I mean, you raise a very good point. You know with the, there, there are two different types of Medicare options, Medicare supplements and Medicare advantage. The Medicare advantage is dependent on a network of strong network. If you have a strong network for a Medicare advantage plan, I think that’s the best bang for the buck. And then the Philadelphia region, which is where we’re headquartered, they Medicare advantage plan it’s extremely affordable and the access to care is second to none because of the strong network we have. But if you go somewhere else in the country where that network isn’t as strong, the Medicare advantage plan is a very different plan than it is here. And it’s really important to know the difference between the two. And it’s a great question. Sorry.

Mindy Thomas:
So if they started Medicare this month and they decide to move in November of this year, 2020 to Miami, can they change their Medicare plan when they move or do they have to wait until the enrollment period to change plans?

Meg McGinn:
They can change if they’re, if they’re moving permanently down to Miami, they can change it. It’s considered a qualifying event. A move is a qualifying event so that they can change. If they were a snowbird, let’s say, and they’re down in Miami four or five months of the year, but their primary residence is up here, then you cannot change your plan until open enrollment, which is in October.

Mindy Thomas:
Okay. I have another question about college students. Do they can they jump on healthcare plans right now?

Meg McGinn:
You know, it’s again, something that just, we just learned about in the last week. So many colleges offer health plans to their students and a lot of parents take advantage of that. They removed them from their health plan and they enroll them on the college plan. Well these college health plans are now terming these students because there’s nobody there. It’s important for parents to understand. You either have to get them back on your plan or they are eligible to, to enroll in, in a, an individual plan or short term medical plan. But, but the parents aren’t, are aware that their children could be truly exposed right now not being covered at all. So it is important, but yes, you can swing back onto your your, your family plan and that is as easy as contacting your member services and saying, I want to add my child or that’s something our, our customer service team does is just call we’re adding our children back on. And you can literally like flip a switch, take them on and off when needed.

Mindy Thomas:
Well, Meg, this is been an invaluable interview. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the resources and the information and the wealth of knowledge that you have offered our viewers today. Tell my viewers how they can find you if they choose to do some consulting with you.

Meg McGinn:
Well, w w Mindy, we really do appreciate the opportunity just to talk and if anybody is in need of any sort of guidance regarding healthcare, you can contact us at wwwdotospreyhealth.com or you can call (610) 727-3822, and we would be more than happy to hear how we can help you learn how we can help here, what you need assistance with and just be some sort of a support during this difficult time. Happy to do that.

Mindy Thomas:
Well, it’s been great to have you on the show, Meg. Much continued success to our viewing audience, especially our healthcare workers and our essential workers. We appreciate your service and sacrifice. Everyone. Have a happy and safe week with the ones you love. And let’s, we’re in it to win it so we will win it. I will see you here next week.

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Mindy Thomas Interviews Meg McGinn, President/Founder of Osprey Health appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-meg-mcginn-president-founder-of-osprey-health/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Ruth Campbell https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-ruth-campbell https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-ruth-campbell#respond Sun, 19 Apr 2020 14:08:40 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=877 Mindy Thomas interviews Ruth Campbell in a 30 minute segment on RVNTV.

Two career counselors chat about making a career decision and how they struggled too.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Ruth Campbell appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Ruth Campbell

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Ruth Campbell

Mindy Thomas interviews Ruth Campbell in a 30-minute segment on RVNTV.
Two career counselors chat about making a career decision and how they struggled too.

Mindy Thomas:

Hi, I’m Mindy Thomas and this is Career Chat, which airs every Monday at 1130 and Tuesday night at 8:00 PM. If you’re thinking about career issues, you want to stay tuned to our show today because we have a very special guest in the studio. Ruth Campbell from Delaware County community college who is the Coordinator of Career Services is here with us today. I’m so happy that you made it out and that you’re visiting with us today. Welcome to the show, Ruth.

Ruth Campbell:

Thank you Mindy. Thank you for having me as your guest.

Mindy Thomas:

That I am really delighted to let our audience know so much about you. You’ve been a mentor to me for the last 25 years since graduate school. And Ruth’scredentials are some of the best out there. She is not only a board certified coach, she’s a licensed professional counselor, a national certified career counselor. She’s also a nationally certified counselor and professor at the college I at Delaware County community college in media, Pennsylvania. She coordinates the career services and is Delaware County is home to a probably about 10,000 people. And so I’d love to kick this interview off with, tell us about your role. I know you have a massive role over there, but tell us a little bit about what you do.

Ruth Campbell:

Oh, thank you. Well as you said, I’m coordinator of career services, but I also do career counseling with students, with community residents. And I do a lot of outreach to classes. I do workshops and you know, I’m trying to not just sit in my office and wait for students to come to me. I’m going out to where students are as well. When I

Mindy Thomas:

Think about your long lived career as a career counselor, I you know, think about what, what really drew you to becoming a career counselor. I know that we both struggled trying to figure out what to do with our lives. You at an earlier age, me and midlife. And so I thought maybe you could tell us a little bit about how you decided to make that career decision.

Ruth Campbell:

That’s a great question, Mindy, like a lot of other people. In my twenties I tried out a number of things and I was trying to find myself like a number of people in their twenties and I finally landed into a, where I became administrator of a social service agency. I mean, I should have never been hired for that job. I had no idea what I was doing. I hated every second of it. And after that ended, I realized I had to do some career counseling on myself, although at that point I didn’t know I was doing career counseling and I went to the library, there was someone there who was storing a program for community residents, so on careers. And I did all my homework and I went to talk to her and later on she said, I thought you were a plant from the state. So I knew I must’ve been doing something right. And then I sought out a graduate program. I went to Westchester university for higher education counseling and it was a great fit. And although the head of the department at the time said, well, we’re not really looking for people like you. You’re a job hopper. And yeah, and of course, having gotten my degree, I’m anything but a job hopper anymore,

Mindy Thomas:

That’s for sure. You’ve been at the college a long, long time, very long time, and you’ve influenced hundreds and hundreds of students. And also Ruth is the counseling supervisor for anyone that wants to be a career counselor. So that’s how we met. Actually, and I interned under Ruth teen years ago. So we both we have that in common. In fact, that I also struggled with figuring out what career to choose for myself. I did a whole unstructured situation with analyzing my skills and taking assessments and, and, you know, just wow, okay. I ended up here. But today with a lot of people struggling and there’s a lot of folks struggling out there. They don’t know what to do. They can’t figure it out. They’ve talked to their moms, their dads, their husbands, their spouses, and still, you know, it’s a futile attempt. Sometimes we need professional help to sort things out. So is that what you’re finding at the community college? The, the students and the community members that come in? Are they struggling with those issues too?

Ruth Campbell:

Absolutely. Monday. And I think you’re, you’re bringing up the idea of students and community residents because we also deal with community residents. We’ll ask other people what should I do? And of course that often doesn’t go too well. It’s your

Mindy Thomas:

Mother and your mother wanted you to be a pharmacist. Can you imagine? My parents wanted me to be a teacher and a nurse or a nurse, right? No, that’s not happening right now. So that’s what’s happening

Ruth Campbell:

Still with parents telling children, right? You must be in medical, you must be in healthcare. And unfortunately it’s not always a good fit. And then there’s the other thing that sometimes people do, which is, well, where are the jobs that pay the most money? Or where are the hot jobs, where the most jobs are? So what we try to do, and you know this very well and you use this in your work too, is we follow the career decision making pyramid, which is steps to a very good appropriate career decision. And the bottom of the pyramid, the foundation is know thyself. And that’s where we do assessments to look at personality interests, values and other aspects of self. And once the person has gone through that, then the next step is career exploration. There’s some wonderful websites for career exploration such asO O H career one stop videos.

Ruth Campbell:

These are all resources that people can Google and find readily for information about different fields. Go ahead. Oh, so I was going say that there’s a specific framework there is that you use as a career counselor. And we sort of liken it as a triangle and in making a good career decision, which is at the top, at the bottom, Ruth is saying it’s really self assessment and knowing myself you use what kind of tools to do the assessments you’re using the Myers-Briggs, right? Right. For was definitely the strong interest inventory. We have card sorts that we use on finding motivated skills on values. There are many assessments and we, some of the paper and pencil assessments are really, some of the best are fun, aren’t they? I’m happiest when I am where, you know, we, we love to read those cause they give us so much information about a person.

Ruth Campbell:

Right. I just read about these people are very well known. Two professors from Stanford university bill Burnett and Dave Evans, and they teach a course called designing your life. And it’s the most popular course at Stanford. And one of the things that they do in their course is have people create a flow journal, which I thought was brilliant. You know, the idea being when do you feel most alive, most animated? And just keeping track of that. And I was reading that one of their students was an art history major, but she said, well, but I hate writing and I don’t really like art history that much. And she said, when I, in my flow journal, what I really discovered was what I really like is math. I mean, you know,

Mindy Thomas:

It’s interesting. Do they talk about what do you do when you lose track of time? That would be a flow moment. That’s a flow moment flow mode. That’s when you have to set an alarm because you’re in the middle of writing or you’re in the middle of playing piano or singing or talking. And, and you, you need to get to an appointment. That’s a very interesting flow chart that they use. So do you graph it out? Are you writing this out? Are you

Ruth Campbell:

Well, apparently with Evanson Burnett, they just have their students create a journal, like what pops up and a given day like, gosh, here’s a time when I lost track of time. Here was a moment that was a flow moment. And over time they track it. Fantastic.

Mindy Thomas:

So that, that career pyramid, if you will, starts with knowing myself. And then we go to looking at the career and occupational information. Ruth mentioned the occupational outlook handbook. She mentioned career one-stop. That is my personal favorite. If you have never been there, you’ve got to go there because they do have videos, they have all kinds of assessments, free assessments on there. Even if like for example, you were a stockbroker and you wanted to find out, well what careers could I transition into? There’s a little platform inside that you plug in stockbroker and it generates all of the careers related career related careers where you could transfer your skills. Right. So it’s very helpful. What else do you recommend on the resources? Well, department of labor

Ruth Campbell:

Yeah, those are all from the department of labor. O O H O net and career one-stop. They’re all from the department of labor. Okay. Gotcha. Okay. Yeah. And the idea is that after knowing myself after researching different possibilities then a student or a community resident is in a better position to start making some decisions. And for a student at a community college that would involve, do I want to transfer and get a bachelor’s degree or not? And if so, where do I want to transfer? Or what about these other majors that really aren’t for transfer? And then the final step is action planning. What steps do I need to take to implement my goals? And in a community college we might call that an academic plan. And it’s what steps do I need to do over a period of time to further things step by step?

Mindy Thomas:

Well, Delaware County community colleges I mentioned is home to 10,000 students and community members, they have over 50 degree programs. They have 35 transitional programs in addition to a number of certificate programs. And if you’re over the age of 65, you actually can take one or two courses a semester for free. And so they send out that brochure every half semester or every semester they send it every semester. And it’s just the best value going, wouldn’t you say?

Ruth Campbell:

I think that that’s one of the secrets about community college is what a great value it is. And I recently had a student, former student contact me to say, I want someone from the college to come and speak to our community group. And she said, I know I could do it cause I loved it as a student, but I want somebody from the college to come and talk about it. That’s how good it was. Wow.

Mindy Thomas:

Well speaking of secrets, when we come right back, I’m going to share a secret that I don’t even think Ruth Campbell knows.

Ruth Campbell:

Whoa. Can’t wait. Stay tuned.

Mindy Thomas:

And welcome back to Career Chat. We are with Ruth Campbell from Delaware County community college who is the coordinator of career services. My former professor from graduate school. I’m so delighted you are here.

Ruth Campbell:

And we left just a few minutes ago and I was saying that I had a little secret to share, which I don’t think Ruth really knows about me. I went to community college. No, I started really community college at Northern Virginia community college, also known as Nova cocoa in Annandale, Virginia. Wow. And I had a great experience and I did transfer up to a four year state college after a semester or two. And I don’t think you ever knew that. I did. I did. And you know, I think that says something because you know, my former student that I was referring to says that more people should go to community college, don’t rack up so much debt, the courses transfer really well and the instruction is high quality. So you’re just a living example of it all. I went to multiple colleges and really was clueless about what major to choose back in the day.

Ruth Campbell:

So you all are not alone out there cause I didn’t know what to major in. I did not know what career to choose and struggled. Right along with Ruth. And so I’m curious about how have the students changed over the years. Can you tell us a little bit about, you know, is that a big change? Yes. I think there’s a large change and one of the changes is that more and more students are working longer and longer hours at jobs. So that makes being a college student very challenging. Because as we know in college there’s homework, you know, that has to be done and it’s just juggling all these responsibilities becomes very difficult for college community college students. The other one of course is that everybody is attached to their smartphone phones literally and figuratively. And that’s been a big change since when I started doing what I do.

Ruth Campbell:

Yeah. I noticed that Delaware County community college has a number of matriculation or arc articulation agreements with area universities. Could you name a couple of those so students can go for two years get an associates degree and then transfer out. But the list is just endless, it seems. And we have more than a hundred institutions of higher education in Philadelphia. So who is, who have you forged agreements with? Well certainly West Chester university where we both attended temple university, Drexel, Drexel university Arcadia. They’re just so many different agreements and our students really take advantage of meeting with transfer advisors to map out their plans. And even if we don’t have a specific agreement, the transfer advisor will do research and we’ll help the student with that. Well what do you need to do? What courses do you need to take here at community college that are going to readily transfer to the school of your choice? We don’t want students to waste time and money. Fantastic.

Mindy Thomas:

I was thinking about your career and it’s a long one and it’s exciting to case conference with you from time to time, Ruth, and I’m always appreciative of your counsel. I was curious about the profession itself. What, what do you find exciting as a career counselor? What, you know, makes your engines run in, in this profession?

Ruth Campbell:

Well it’s a great field. I’ve been doing it for a long time. I still love it. And one of the things that I love is that no two days are ever the same. Of course, no two people are ever the same. We don’t do something cookie cutter. We’re custom designing what work we’re going to do with a given individual. And I just love sitting in my office. If I, if I’m doing it in my office and listening to someone, tell me the story. What’s your story? Let me hear the story. And everybody’s got a story. There’s a lot of stories. Everybody’s fine, everybody’s got a story. And those stories can really be the clue to where to go for the future too.

Mindy Thomas:

I think what I like about that career counseling piece is very much the journey because we don’t know when someone sits down where the journey is going to take us. And it’s not a process that you can push, right? Right, right. Working in a sea of ambiguity, we’re trying to gather the massive amounts of information and use our tools and use our inner wisdom to help people along that journey.

Ruth Campbell:

It’s an organic process, isn’t it, Mindy?

Mindy Thomas:

And there’s people that we meet with too that you talk about the magic bullet. Can you describe what that looks like?

Ruth Campbell:

The magic bullet. What’s that mean? [inaudible] They want magic. Like a magic bullet. Yeah. And I’m always telling my colleagues we don’t do magic. So what does that look like? What does that, you know, how does that present itself? Well, I think it presents itself. When a person says to me as a counselor well, I didn’t really do the homework, you know, I didn’t have time, but what do you think I do? You know, what’s the answer? You’re supposed to Intuit what? I’m going to be wonderful at and tell me, and that’s what I’m paying you. That’s that’s a real red flag and that’s not gonna work.

Mindy Thomas:

Other challenges that you find with folks that are not following the process, do they?

Ruth Campbell:

Well I think a lot of people will think that it’s, they don’t like the idea of a process. And so in an initial session with a student, let’s say we’re trying to size up, well, what does this student need? And some students will be willing to engage in a process but some just probably want more like some information and that’s it for right now. But you know, for people that are really going through an entire career decision making process and they’re buying into it, that’s a process.

Mindy Thomas:

Yeah. Yeah. One of our mentors is Richard Bowles. Yes. From what color is your parachute? I sometimes have people that have read through that whole book. They’ve done every exercise. I’m in the back of the book under the state of Pennsylvania for career counseling, which I’m very flattered that he put me in. And they still can’t figure it out and they undergo counseling. What do you think is missing from reading a book that’s teaching you how to make a career decision versus the process with a counselor, a professional counselor

Ruth Campbell:

Slur? Well you know, the book is good, very good, very good. However, it’s hard to do career work in isolation. It really is. And I think that one reason people will come to see a career counselor is to have a dialogue to get feedback. And not that we’re going to give a client or a student the answer, that’s not what we do. But we’re there to provide guidance as to how to move through to the next step. What are some ideas what are your strengths that I’m observing? And you know, so in isolation, someone doesn’t get that feedback. So we’re really a good backed board. A good sounding board.

Mindy Thomas:

Yeah. Well, it’s interesting because when I Googled how many people were happily employed in the United States, probably it, I, I just know it was an error with, because it said 85% of Americans are happily employed and there’s just no way that number is correct. So I know that you have the latest research in stat on that. Could you tell us what’s a straight streetscape?

Ruth Campbell:

Well, I, I knew that I had heard that two thirds of workers were not happy at work and that 15% hated going to work. And I thought, who said that? I have to look this up. And it was Dave Evans and bill Burnett in their book designing your life. And you know, they’re Stanford professors they came out of Silicon Valley. I don’t think they were making this up, although it’s hard to believe that 15% of workers hate what they do and two thirds aren’t so happy. Yes. You mean 15%? Like what they do hate, hate, hate what they do. Hate it. Yeah. And from their point of view, two thirds, they’re not so happy. Yeah. Yeah. And then then you throw on top of the incompetency at the managerial level. So you have managers that are in positions that have no business being there.

Ruth Campbell:

They have no business supervising people. Right. And that happens quite a bit. It does. And I think one thing that makes a lot of people very unhappy in a work situation is never getting any acknowledgement. The recognition that had a boy. Right. Some people don’t care about money, they just want someone to recognize they’re doing a good job even though you know, people are killing themselves and they’re just not getting any recognition. That’s very difficult. Can you share with us a couple success stories or anecdotes you know, that you think would be inspiring to our audience that’s sitting there struggling and wondering what to do next? Well, I had a couple of students at the community college that are really memorable and one is I changed the names here, but one is Sean and Sean was working full time as a janitor in a school district.

Ruth Campbell:

And he came to me for career counseling when he first started at community college. And we did his personality through the Myers Briggs. I’m sure we did other assessments too. And he said, well, I want to make money. And after going through the process, he settled in on a business major and I think it was really good fit for him. And he just graduated with almost a four O at DCCC and he now transferred to West Chester university in business. And he’s just such a special student. And he came back, he won this. What made this so special was right when he was leaving the school. He came to see me, he came to visit to say, I’m moving on and thank you for everything you did. And he came back again recently when he came to pick up his diploma. And it’s just so that’s something that makes our work so satisfying is the relationships that we forge with people that we work with. It’s a very rewarding and meaningful

Mindy Thomas:

Career that we share.

Ruth Campbell:

It is, it is. And I’m another student who was from West Africa calling Ben and he was a very good student and he wanted to get into nursing. And he was going to transfer to Jefferson which is very high caliber, a place to study anything medical. And so I, but I worked with him as an advisor when he was taking all of his science courses and got to know him well and he got into the accelerated nursing program at Jefferson. Oh gosh. And then he got hired at in a very prestigious area, mainline health in the operating room. And after he got that job, he came back to see me and he brought me a soccer scarf with my name engraved in it. And that was really special. It’s the relationships that are the best.

Mindy Thomas:

Yes. That’s what’s, that’s what life is made up of. Makes it worthwhile. Yeah. Well it has been a great, great pleasure and, and such an honor to bring you on the show today. Thank you. I really enjoyed this and I wish you continued success at the college and want to thank the audience for tuning in. We will be back next week. As I said, we are every Monday at 11:30 AM and Tuesday night at 8:00 PM. See you next week.

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Ruth Campbell appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-ruth-campbell/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas on “Morning Coffee” https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-lefkowitz-2 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-lefkowitz-2#respond Wed, 11 Mar 2020 20:49:03 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=761 Mindy Thomas interview at the “Morning Coffee” Show at RVN TV in Cherry Hill, NJ.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas on “Morning Coffee” appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Mindy Thomas on “Morning Coffee”

Mindy Thomas on “Morning Coffee”

Mindy interviews with Mark Iorio and Jim DeLorenzo at RVNTV in Cherry Hill, NJ. We talked about what Thomas Career Consulting offers and how the firm is different from other career practitioners. Whether you are in need of a resume or you’re not sure about what career direction to take, take the time out to listen to this interview.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Welcome back to morning coffee on RV MTV. I’m Jim deal Lorenzo Mark I Oreo and we have a special guest joining us in the studio this morning. Mindy Thomas, who is the president of Thomas career consulting and is about to become one of the newest RVN and TV show hosts with her show Career Chat starting in the first week of March. So, welcome to the team, Mindy.

Mindy Thomas:
Thank you so much. I’m really happy to be here. Thanks for the invite.

Jim DiLorenzo:
You’re welcome. Great to have you. So how did you get your start as a career consultant? Where did you find your path towards that business?

Mindy Thomas:
Well I would say that in the last quarter of 2008, when the crash was happening, I was already a career counselor and a resume writer side doing the gig on the side as most of us had been doing. You have a full time job, you’re working on resumes because people are asking you to write their resumes because they know that’s what you do and you’re doing career counseling on the side. At the time of the crash in 2008, I was recruiting patent attorneys in Washington DC. My job was to penetrate the top firms in Washington and build the pipeline of attorneys. The crash happens in the last quarter 2008. I’m looking around, I’m working as a legal recruiter with lawyers. I’m the only career counselor on staff doing this recruiting. And I’m saying, you know, something just is going down here and y’all better have a second job.

Mindy Thomas:
And I had another gig serving as an adjunct faculty member at Immaculata teaching about six different courses. Accelerated degree. I loved that intensity one night a week. You know, you may do that yourselves. But and you know, I was coaching the other attorneys on the team saying y’all better have a second job because something is happening here. And, frankly I I had just gone through cancer and I woke up the day after, it was like a divine intervention. I remember the day specifically looking like the day of 911, it was crystal clear. Sunny skies were blue. And the inner wisdom inside me said, I know you, I know what to do. I woke up, I never wanted to be in business for myself, but I knew that that moment happened and I went with it.

Mindy Thomas:
Yeah. I knew exactly what I want to do, write resumes and do career counseling and do it for myself. How nice it would be not to report to someone. And I, I just went with it in 90 days, rolled out the website and I was going to specialize in legal recruiting. And then what happened was I found that I enjoyed all the industries. So I initially went into it to recruit lawyers and write resumes for them, but then decided I didn’t want to just have a niche of doing legal.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Why limit yourself? And especially at that period of time with the economy the way it was and, and people looking for a way to advance. Yeah. That’s great. Move on your part. So tell, tell us a little bit about what career counseling means, what it entails and what makes you and your firms so different.

Mindy Thomas:
Well, what makes me different from my esteemed colleagues out there is that most resume writers are just that they’re writers, they’re not career counselors. And most career counselors are not resume writers. True. The career counseling package that I offer is a four session package designed for people who don’t like where they are, don’t know how to get aware of that, get out of where they are. Feel that they need a change. They see the leadership changing in the environment, they’re where they are and they decide like, Oh my gosh, I got to do something, but now I don’t know what to do. Right? So I say this with love… That I work with people who don’t have a clue what to do next. And there’s a lot of folks out there that feel this way. And what we do is we, we do the deep dive.

Mindy Thomas:
There’s an old mantra from Georgetown where I pursued a certificate in executive coaching —those that self-reflect can self correct. So we have to get quiet, we have to calm down. Like Taylor Swift says you got to calm down. And that’s my job is to create more awareness for people around themselves, right? So looking at your personality, your values, the skills you want to use, not just what you’re good at, the realities of your world. We use that as the foundation of making a good career decision. And through that process and using formal tools, informal tools, reflection, and the conversation, we drive the options based on what’s important to you and the skills you want to use against the job market. Because as you know, you can be completely suited for something and there be no jobs out there. Of course, after the due diligence and research has been done, then we can make an action plan or make a decision and then an action plan. Then they can move to the career marketing side of the house, which has to do with resume, cover letter. And of course LinkedIn, right? Yeah. That’s really what the two service lines that I offer, career counseling and career marketing.

Mark Iorio:
Yeah. So you’re getting people to really follow their passion, what’s inside them, what drives them every day, what, what motivates them to do good in the world and then, and then hone that down to skill sets that they have or possess and then go out there and find positions. Right. That fit that.

Mindy Thomas:
That’s correct. And what we’re trying to do is align them with their authentic self. Okay. You can be very good at something. You can have high skill and very low interest. I’m trying to get this up right. Yeah. And match that. Yeah.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Okay. Interesting. Yep. I know that I have worked with some career counselors in the past, both as a client and as my clients and I’ve enjoyed the process. I’ve learned a lot from the people that I’ve worked with and I’ve always found, especially in the last few years, engaging yourself in that passion and finding that passion and going forward with it. And also looking at what for want of a better term, what your vocation is, what your calling is, what do you, what do you feel like you’re doing? And it seems to me that you have found that your calling and you’re trying to share that with other people who maybe don’t quite know what their calling is yet.

Mindy Thomas:
That’s correct. It, I don’t know what I love more. I don’t know if I like the make-over on paper, the resume overhaul or the journey of the counseling process. They’re both equally rewarding and

Mark Iorio:
And then helping people find a slot and actually be fulfilled once they find that slot has to be very rewarding. Yeah. It’s got to give you a big rush,

Mindy Thomas:
Big Time. Especially when they land in the right role. When my clients land, I am celebrating doing the happy dance at home when I get that word because, you know, they’re stunned. They are absolutely stunned that they did it. And I I believe in never giving up you no option to fail the old Marine Corps way. As you know, I grew up with a Marine Corps fighter pilot, so there was no option to fail. God bless your dad.

Mark Iorio:
So let’s go back to the 2008 epiphany right now, which is you pretty much have full employment, right? You’re pretty close to it. You’ve got three and a half percent unemployment. What’s the difference between where we were back, Mindy and where we are today and can you gauge the difficulty between helping clients back then and helping clients today?

Mindy Thomas:
Well, when I got laid off in January 2009 that day, probably 650,000 people got laid off. Yeah. Wow. Wow. I remember that day. And I also remember in just 48 hours I was up on the web and taking that risk and listening to my inner wisdom. I think the difference between then and now is there is this kind of hope that I’ve never seen before. The reason I say this is because my phone is ringing and ringing for both counseling and resume writing. And as I mentioned just last week, Google analytics reported to me that there were 2,788 people that searched for three keywords last month. That’s in the Philadelphia area, right? It was help with resumes, resume writing, and career counseling. Wow. Justin, the Philadelphia area. Just in Philly. Yeah. And I thought, Oh my gosh, there is hope going on. There is, there is so much confidence right now.

Mindy Thomas:
People are happy. Yes. I did see the survey that said 92% of people today are happy with their lives. And I was talking to my mother last night at dinner and we saw, she said, well, you know, what do you think that’s about? So mom, it’s gotta be tied in with their occupations in their jobs and how they’re feeling about their life. People are spending money, they’re going, everyone I know is on vacation and they’re shopping and they’re doing all kinds of fun things. Yup. And so the difference is there’s a hope and confidence happening in this country is real. And the fact that my phone, I mean it’s up 800% from last year, just in one year, the number of calls I’m getting. Wow. So I think that that was a very dark time for all of us. Absolutely. Everybody was unemployed and in the legal market that really plummeted it, you know, back as so many, so many industries. So I feel like you know, taking a risk, people did take risks to go into entrepreneurship and it’s happening now where people are sick and tired of working for other people. Right. I mean how nice is it to work for yourself?

Mark Iorio:
Yes. And sometimes you need that impetus to see, okay, there’s something else out there for me. And sometimes we know what that is, like what you’ve experienced, but also there’s that feeling of, okay, I don’t want to be at the mercy of this situation. I want to take charge of what I’m doing. Yeah. The one thing that hope does for you is it gives you this confidence to say, you know what? I don’t need to be in this position where I’m being treated poorly. Right. I’ve got the confidence, the economy’s better than it’s been maybe in our, absolutely in our entire lifetime. And why don’t I go out and do what I’m passionate about? What makes my heart beat every day? And what makes me want to get out of bed every day rather than working for a person or an organization that doesn’t fit, you know that, that drive, that passion, that North star for us, right?

Mindy Thomas:
Well you’re correct, but the million dollar question is what are you going to do? And that’s where you come in. And that’s where the counseling comes in because people don’t understand that there’s a framework and a process. And I often describe it as like a triangle in making a good career decision here at the top. What’s at the bottom and the, and the foundation is self assessment that then moves to the career options. Then we move to the research and due diligence. Then you can make a plan and an action take an action plan I say. And, and, and so the million dollar question always comes back to, well, what am I going to do? Well, I don’t know unless I do that journey with you. Yeah, exactly, and sometimes people do end up in entrepreneurship, right? They come into career counseling, we’re going to find another job, and then all of a sudden there’s just like another sort of path that they never even expected.

Mindy Thomas:
Just like myself, I never expected to be in business for myself, never, but I felt that it was a divine intervention the day after I finished treatment and I will always credit that that move because I never considered myself to be highly intuitive person. I have become that and I urge people out there watching to listen to themselves because there’s a voice going on and there’s a reason for that. I always say they’re the angels talking to you and trust your inner wisdom. When I meet young people that have high intuition, I always say to them, trust it. Go with it for the rest of your life personally and professionally because you will save yourself so much heartbreak. Then there are folks that don’t have the inner wisdom. I am always giving them books to read. Let’s build on that. Let’s see if we can tap into that because it will never steer you wrong. So in that case, that morning I woke up and I knew it and I, I just went with it. I thank God for that.

Mark Iorio:
No, we’re going to bless you. We’re going to have to take a quick break. Just a great conversation. Thank you so much. You know?

Jim DiLorenzo:
Yeah, really interesting. So we’ll take a quick break and we’ll be right back after a message from our sponsors.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Welcome back to morning coffee on RVNTV. I’m Jim DeLorenzo along with Mark Iorio and our special guest in studio this morning, the newest RVN TV host– Mindy Thomas of Thomas Career Consulting and she’s going to be hosting the new show career chat starting the first week of March. So welcome back Mindy, where we were having having a great conversation and we were talking about that, that inner inner voice, the gut, the gut reaction, the, the trusting your gut. Do you find it people don’t trust their gut and fall into trouble more often than they should or is it something that people say, you know, I, I had that feeling. Do you get that response from people when you talk to them?

Mindy Thomas:
That’s a really good question. I often talk to people that have been terminated and I myself was terminated at a job. It was tragic. It like, you know, you just stand still and say what? Right. And when someone comes in, for example, if, if they just hired me to do the resume writing cover letter and LinkedIn bios and they tell me straight up that they got fired. I ask was it due to performance? What was it due to? People skills? They tell me that whatever the reason is, they tell me about that and I say, now what did you learn from being terminated? And sometimes they don’t have an answer before I move on to that resume interview with them, I’m going to take off my resume interviewing hat and I’m going to put my counseling hat on because I don’t want that to ever happen to them again. Because if you don’t learn from that experience, you will in fact repeat it again. So if people are caring too much about well they didn’t put this program in. So and so is not doing their job and they’re, you know, really ramping up the emotion on the job. I often say, you know what, this is not your company. Right? If it’s your company, you can get excited about that, but it is not your company. And what tends to happen is I think they get so involved, there’s so down in the rabbit hole and so charged up, right, that they don’t realize it’s not about the numbers, the sales numbers, it’s about how you’re getting along with people or not getting along with people. So I really try to stress that. Let’s learn what is it the biggest learning you’re going to take away because I really don’t want that to happen to anyone ever again. Because it happened to me. It didn’t happen again after that. But so to answer the question, I’d say 50% realize they get a feeling they think something’s going on. Sure. If the other 50% they absolutely have no clue. They can’t see past their nose.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Isn’t that interesting? Because I know it when before I started my business, 21 years ago, I had one, I was at one job for 11 years plus and I could see the writing on the wall and I got out the second job in that, in that five year timeframe management change, I saw the writing on the wall, I got out. Excellent. The third time it happened was when I decided to start my own business. Fantastic. But each time I, there were warning signs and I was able to figure that out. The first time it happened I was saying, I don’t know if I want to do this, but I knew I had to do something. But sometimes we don’t recognize those signs. You know? And it’s, it’s, it’s interesting that 50% of the people that you’re talking to didn’t recognize that sign or didn’t see the writing on the wall or, yeah. So you meant, you mentioned a while ago about, about this subject, Mindy, that you do some personal assessments, right?

Mindy Thomas:
We use formal assessments like the Myers Briggs, the strong interest inventory, the Firo B I use, which assesses your inclusion and affection needs, how you express them and how you want them to express back.

Mark Iorio:
So what are these, what are these tell people when they’re, when someone’s sitting in front of you and you, you look at that triangle, right? And this self assessment part is not really been done yet. They really don’t know who they are as a person, right? They don’t know what drives them. They don’t know what’s, you know, what their passion is, et cetera. Then what, let’s say you give them a Myers Briggs, you’d do a Colby assessment or whatever, whatever other assessments you do, then what?

Mindy Thomas:
Well, they’re going to know if they’re working with me, we are going to go through these assessments and discuss, I want feedback if this is not aligned, if you read this narrative about your personality and it doesn’t match, we’re starting back from scratch. We’re going to look at each, for example, the Myers Briggs assesses you on four dichotomies where you get your energy from, how you gather data. How you make decisions and how you order your world there. 16 possibilities. How I use that is as a tool to share with you the specific industries and occupations that people with your personality profile they’re in and they’re happily employed. Right? Wouldn’t that have been nice to have in high school or college? We didn’t have it. You know, we’re boomers, so we didn’t even have access to that. But today, career counselors love those tools, the strong interest inventory, it takes the personality and your interests and then generates the occupations. These are not in stone. We use them as a tool, as a guideline to generate the ideas. And that’s why journaling is so important because we found that adults that right crystallize their thoughts and from that insight comes.

Mark Iorio:
Interesting. That is interesting. That’s really interesting. I like that.

Mindy Thomas:
When I attended Georgetown’s program for coaching just for [inaudible] really, I had my masters in counseling. I just wanted to know what this billion dollar industry was about. Let me go down to Washington once a month for a week, shut down my business and study with this dynamic cohort of 33 people that were fascinating and from all over the world. And we found that, you know, that when we had to present our cases with executives and we had to ask them to journal, even the busiest executives out there journaled, and you cannot believe the insights that we found. Wow. Yes. So if you write, it crystallizes the thoughts and more insight comes, and I’m not asking you to write what your tasks are tomorrow. I’m asking what are you feeling? What are you thinking about? What’s coming up for you as a result of the work we’re doing?

Mindy Thomas:
Because we’re stirring up a lot when we’re talking about you. Yeah. That is really interesting. I liked, I liked that process. That’s really insightful and very helpful. Do you find that the, the, the clients that you’re working with, have they been journaling or this is something, it’s a new idea to them? Very small percentage of journaling. Okay. Very small percentage. And my audience is really recent. College grads, even grads, not grads, college students that are still, they still haven’t chosen a major parents. I’m on the phone all the time with parents and they want their kids straightened out so they invest in the career counseling process. So you have, you have several tiers of packages that you put together for clients, right. Well, on the career counseling side, there’s one package. It’s four sessions. There’s more bang for the buck if they sign up for the four sessions.

Mindy Thomas:
So I’m really not doing one offs and less, only if they already went through counseling with me. So I had an executive recently that didn’t know whether to leave her or stay and we did a, a one off session and then it turned into a second session. He does not make a move without discussing and I feel very flattered that he discusses these issues with me. But we thought that he was going to go one way, comes in and he’s going this way. And then, then after we do the Benjamin Franklin close on both companies, he ends up, and you know what the Benjamin Franklin pros and cons of each company. He ends up going with the first what the gut feeling was that I personally had for him and that he had, we came back to that. And this is not an intuitive executive.

Mindy Thomas:
He’s very much a sensor. He’s a data analytics person and he’s very much into the here and now here’s what we have. Right? But he took so many risks and I’m really proud of this, a particular executive because he is not, he’s risk-adverse and he has gone into his own business and then went back to corporate. So I, I find that, you know, people can tap into it. It’s not impossible to get to the intuitive side. I feel like, Jim, you’ve got this, you get a feeling, you go with it. And that’s why I like to share that because I think it will help everyone personally, professionally, to listen to what’s in here inside. Yeah. How do you find new clients? Well, I’m really fortunate. If you Google resume writing services, Philadelphia come up, I’m on page one for Google that happens to be connected to the Google reviews that my clients, right? So there’s near a hundred there and it’s, you know, really a wonderful feeling when people you know, feel good about the services and the value they get from working with me. So that’s, that’s really how they find me.

Jim DiLorenzo:
That’s great. Yeah. So if you’re looking for help, really you’re looking for help, you’re looking for advice, you’re looking for some counseling, Mindy Thomas and Thomas Career Consulting. You can find her online at LinkedIn. You can also look at her website, Thomas career consulting.com and she’s going to be here on RVN TV every week, beginning in March with a career chat. What are some of the topics we’re going to be discussing on Career Chat coming up?

Mindy Thomas:
Well, we’re going to talk about everyday people that are out there making transitions. People that had the courage to change jobs. They got a feeling something, something is going down. We’re going to talk about millennials that are in business for themselves. We’re going to talk about franchise coaching. We’re going to have an Italian businessman here from Verona, Italy. That is an attorney that went into the wine business. We’re going to have everyday people like you all. So we’re hoping to share that confidence and that hope with our audience because we really believe that change is happening and you can make that change.

Jim DiLorenzo:
Great. Fantastic. Mindy thank you for joining us for joining us. Terrific. Welcome. Welcome to the RVN family. And we’re going to take a break here and at the top of the hour or we’ll be coming back with a movie madness here on morning coffee. But from Mark and I, this is a farewell for today. We’ll see you again next week and look for Rainmakers Roundup and press conference here on RVN TV.

 

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas on “Morning Coffee” appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-dena-lefkowitz-2/feed 0
Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Bob Koch, The Franchise Coach https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-bob-koch-the-franchise-coach https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-bob-koch-the-franchise-coach#respond Mon, 02 Mar 2020 21:51:27 +0000 https://thomascareerconsulting.com/?p=766 Mindy Thomas interviews Bob Koch, the Franchise Coach on the “Career Chat” Show in RVN TV

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Bob Koch, The Franchise Coach appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>

Mindy Thomas

CAREER CHAT

Mindy Thomas Interviews Bob Koch, The Franchise Coach

Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Bob Koch, The Franchise Coach

Mindy Thomas interviews Bob Koch, a franchise coach from Entrepreneurs Source on RVNTV about how he reinvented his career after many years of corporate life.

Mindy Thomas:

Hi everybody. Welcome to Career Chat. I’m Mindy Thomas and I am hosting a new show starting tomorrow Tuesday at 8:00 PM and Mondays at 11:30 here at RVN TV. We’re going to be interviewing everyday people that have reinvented themselves. They have literally left their jobs, their careers, their bosses that they could not thrive in that environment anymore and they decided to take a leap. My hope is that you’re inspired by these success stories so that it lights a little fire within you and to help advance your career. My belief is that your career is your business and it’s about time that all of us start acting like we’re the CEO. I am honored and privileged to bring on my first guest today, Bob Koch, the Alternative Career Coach of Entrepreneurs Source. Welcome to the show, Bob.

Bob Koch:

Oh, thank you Mindy. It’s my honor and pleasure to be here as well.

Mindy Thomas:

Fantastic. I remember eight years ago when we met, you were in a completely different industry. I was wondering if we could start with what shifted you into this new place of entrepreneurship? What was going on then? I thought we could just pop into the present day and what you’re doing. Entrepreneur’s source.

Bob Koch:

Well, I had worked for a company for like many years. I got up one day and I was on the road constantly and I got up one day and left at eight 30 got in at nine 30 drove 250 miles and I went, wow, I can’t do this. And I was 58 at the time and I said, I can’t, I can’t do this anymore. And I was very much aligned with what I did. I enjoyed it for the for the longest time. But then what happens is you start to reach some level of boredom and that’s what I, there was no room for growth, there was no room, there was nowhere else for me to do. And I was doing the same thing over and over again. And I loved it. And I said, well, what’s wrong with me? There was nothing wrong. I just reached that level of boredom where I had to move on to something, something else I had to make some kind of change.

Bob Koch:

So it’s a sloppy, awkward process. It is sloppy and awkward because what we have to do is we have to understand that we’re going to try to see something that we don’t quite do and use our imagination to get there. And that’s always a very, very, a challenging situation to try to envision yourself doing that something new and well, what do you do at age 58? What, you know, you don’t go to work for another company because you know, companies don’t, they want a 30 year old, not a 50 something year old person. Well, in some cases that’s true. True.

Mindy Thomas:

I don’t believe you should shut the door if you’re 64.

Mindy Thomas:

In spite of your reinventions, you’ve, you’ve really re-engineered your career several times over your lifespan and you’ve been very, very successful. And that industry you were in was the travel industry, right? You were making a lot of money. You love that work. But at some point you decided, I can’t do this anymore. What then did you pursue after you decided I can’t take this anymore?

Bob Koch:

Well, I started realizing that I needed to do something different. So I started really getting my hands on everything that I could read. And I called a friend in Texas who is a consultant and I said, Hey, tell me about being a consultant. Tell me about what you do. He put me in touch with a woman by the name of Judy who is a coach that helped people find and then fund businesses. But the interesting thing was I started looking businesses that were very unique and very different when I in fact had started a coaching program in the last company and I started coaching the younger salespeople to become better and more proficient.

Bob Koch:

I think sometimes I was getting more out of the program than they were, but I was crafting little experiments. And the way you look at this is is like a jigsaw puzzle. But we don’t have the end piece. We want to have the picture. We have the pieces but not the end picture. So one thing sort of led to another and she started coaching me and then I realized, wow, what I really wanted to do was coach people what I and I needed to get out of sales. I had done it for over 30 some years and I literally burned out of the whole thing, but I still had an altruistic nature. What I wanted to kind of help people, because I saw what sometimes corporations do and between mergers, acquisitions, downsizes and all the shifts that go on out there. And people have tons of skills, but they don’t see how they segue into different businesses.

Mindy Thomas:

So Bob, I remembered that you pursued a master’s in counseling and I know in your heart of hearts you’re really a helper. So when you started to coach within the company, I think what you’re saying is that you didn’t realize that right in front of you stood this opportunity for you to pursue that you are in fact a coach and now you’re going to go into a business coaching other folks. So that brings us to the franchise business, which seems to be a mystery for many of us out here. The questions we ask are how do you get into it? How much does it cost? Do I have to have a hundred thousand dollars to invest in a franchise today? I read recently that a franchise operations or coaching opportunities are really increasing over the years. There’s three quarter of a million franchise opportunities out there in the U S correct.

Bob Koch:

There’s a lot. I mean, you can go onto the internet and see thousands and thousands of business. Some good, some not so good, but think of it this way. It’s like if you were going to go to court, would you represent yourself? Absolutely not. So, so yes, if you fall into that bottomless pit and, and you make assumptions and here’s the mind blowing thing that most people don’t realize is the largest franchisee with McDonald’s is a vegan. Oh my gosh, I did not know that he likes the model. I did not know that. He doesn’t eat the so much enamored with the food. He likes the models. So you know, what you’ve got to do is look at your skills and what is it that you’d be doing that that business would emulate your skills. Because you know, fear and passion, you know, are opposites.

Bob Koch:

So something you’re very passionate about, you can’t be afraid of. And I think that’s, that’s the, that’s the caveat to this whole thing is what are you excited about? You know, and for me it was, it was literally helping people, you know, helping people. I have a virtual office I got off the road because I was getting burned out from it. And when it, when I understood my criteria is like kind of light bulb went off and said, what do I have to lose? And if you were successful in a company, would you have that same type of success in a business? That’s the key, you know? And that’s what I was looking for. What do you think really distinguishes you against all other franchise coaches out there? Cause I can imagine there’s a lot of folks doing what you do, right? The key to the whole thing is to get to a person, to a point of clarity.

Bob Koch:

I don’t want to sell somebody a business. I want to make sure that, you know, you’re finding something that matches up to your income, your lifestyle, your wealth and your equity. All those things that you would like to kind of accumulate in life or build in life. And if I can get you to that point and you could say to me, Mindy, I can see myself doing this. I love this, I want to go ahead with it. Then our work together has been a fortunate and benefit for you. And that’s, that’s the key is getting a person to a point of clarity where they can see themselves doing it. It can take eight weeks, it can take eight months. So are you saying then that your expertise and distinction among all the other franchise coaches is that you have a talent for assessing the skills and the value of individuals?

Bob Koch:

Yes. So my first meeting with a client is I go through their resume and what I say I do is I reframe their career. I look for those little nuances, those little things that they do. So spontaneous, so natural. They may take it for granted, and then I start to download, seeing them doing that same function in a business. And an example I’m working with with the gentlemen down at Dover Air Force base. So he’s got really good management skills, but he’s lived 20 some years in the military, so he can’t quite see how that segues into the, into the, into the, into the private sector. So it’s my job to kind of take those tools and be able to visualize and then I turn that over to him.

Bob Koch:

Then it becomes his movie to run with it. And just for our audience clarification, a C five as an aircraft. Yes. Okay. Thank you very much. That’s a big aircraft. Is it not? They move tanks and helicopters and them. It’s, it’s a monster plane. Yeah. Very good. Very good. So who is your typical client? A typical client is, I sort of divide it into two sectors. I do a lot of military work. I go down to Dover air force base, Carlisle war college, and they have a boots to business class and I speak to those veterans who are retiring. St Joe’s has an entrepreneurial jumpstart program. I do a lot of work and speaking there. So that’s one sector in terms of the retiring veteran, the other sector is somebody who’s about in their fifties got caught in a merger and maybe taking a little bit longer to get back into the workforce.

Bob Koch:

I asked them the question, have you ever gone into a business and interviewed the owner? And if they come back to me and say, yes, they’re flirting with this 80% of the public flirts with the concept of doing something on their own. All right, absolutely. But now to make it happen is, is always that sloppy, awkward process to get to that. To that point, what is the youngest person age wise that that has bought into a franchise opportunity? 26 26 and all the way up to what age are you working with then? I’ve just placed a guy 62 years of age. Okay. And what if someone is sitting in our audience saying, I would love to be in business for myself, but I don’t have, I don’t have much money. Can you put someone into a business? Do they need the dough, the cash to jump into this?

Bob Koch:

Well, they need a lot less than they think they do. There’s a lot of funding programs that are backed by the federal government, by the SBA, small business administration that, you know, if you’re going to borrow a hundred thousand, you need a cash injection of 11,000. Okay? All right. Now, once you get that money, if you choose to put that back into your pocket, but that cash injection has to come from you. Okay? So there’s a lot of misperceptions out there. Misperceptions that most of it is food. When it’s not 5% is food, but 95% of the public perceive it. The, and there’s so many other businesses and unique businesses out there that people would have never realized. It’s a business. Somebody came in and fixed something for you and it was a franchise. What would be an example of that? Oh, you’ve got, you’ve got one.

Bob Koch:

My washer and dryer broke what we call mr applier, the guy you called where? Mr. Appliance. Oh, mr appliance. A franchise. The guy comes out, fixes everything. He has a little tablet. I put my credit card in, the tablet goes swipe and he’s out the door. Wow. There’s no receivables. I’m paid. He’s paid on the spot. Their marketing is phenomenal. So you know, people have different skills and you always hire to your weakness. So somebody who’s not really good at marketing, alright, that’s an ideal situation for them. Somebody who’s not a, you know, because they’re going to do the marketing, they’re going to get a good search. The phone is going to ring. All right, the person’s going to answer the phone. Hey, our owner’s going to be in your neighborhood Tuesday or Thursday, what would you like? Boom. Comes out and performs the service.

Mindy Thomas:

So I imagine that you really interviewed that guy when he came to fix your washer and dryer, right?

Bob Koch:

Yeah. I wanted to know all about how he liked it, how he was performing in it and the whole nine yards.

Mindy Thomas:

Well, very interesting. I was wondering if I wanted to start a franchise and I didn’t really know what kind of franchise opportunity I would be good at. Are you saying that your assessment process would help me decide how to do that?

Bob Koch:

It’s appealing of the onion. Okay. You don’t know what you don’t know. So the first interview, we’re going to kind of peel it down a little bit. I’m going to send you some assessments. I’m gonna send you quick tests to kind of take, we’re building this criteria or I’m building it for you. My third meaning I’m going to come back in and I’m going to say, you like education, Mindy, you like this, you like that. And I’m going to give you a couple of opportunities that are based on a criteria that we’ve formulated in, in, in a couple of meetings together.

Mindy Thomas:

Bob, this is all great stuff. We have to take a break right now. We’re going to come back and revisit this. Very thought. We’ll be right back.

Mindy Thomas:

Welcome back everybody. I’m Mindy Thomas, the host of career chat and today we’re speaking with Bob Koch, the Alternative Career Coach of Entrepreneurs Source. We were just speaking Bob about the assessment process that you do for every individual that contacts you about a possible franchise opportunity.

Mindy Thomas:

And so it seems like in your mind’s eye you take in all the data and then more, is that right? Yeah, it’s, it’s, it’s an ongoing process because when you start to peel down the onion, you know, and I give people a couple of opportunities. And the way that you look at it is like in the movie karate kid, you know, he says, wax on, wax off. And every time that you have, I have a contact with one of my referral partners. You not only learn a little bit about the business, but you learn a little bit about yourself and there’s a couple of learning curves that take place. One of them is about the business and you’ll learn a lot about how businesses are structured, but you’ll also learn, you know, what is it that’s important to me?

Bob Koch:

How do I build that criteria. And for me, when I realized I could do this virtually, I have a place in Florida, so I will, I will do it from Florida. I could do it from anywhere. And I like the speaking engagements. So I get out and I get eyeball to eyeball with people cause I enjoy that and I was able to kind of create the painting that I wanted to paint. I was able to be able to kind of kind of do that. Now, not a lot of businesses, Lau Lau you that they’re a little bit more rigid. But this allowed me the autonomy, the creativity. And that’s really kind of what, what made sense for me. So as a person goes through this, what happens is one business starts to align with what they’re, they’re all about as they start to discover it.

Bob Koch:

And one starts to fall apart, fall away. And that’s perfectly normal because contrast helps you to find, I give you vanilla, chocolate or strawberry. Why did you like the chocolate? How’d you like the strawberry? Okay. And then we talk about that. And then there’s different scenarios that seemed to unfold. One of the key points though is when I’m working with people, I say, look, you, you have to have your spouse involved or your significant other emotionally, financially, alright. Or physically, physically, they have to work in the business with you financially, they’re going to be a part of it or they’re going to cheerlead you and be emotionally one of those, two of those, three of those. If not, it’s really going to be hard for you to to go ahead. So if I wanted to have a conversation with you, I need to have my significant other or my spouse with me at some.

Mindy Thomas:

We do that at some point at time. Okay. Yes. I’m curious about the training that’s involved when you buy a franchise, what does that look like? Is that a week? Is that two weeks? Is it a month of training? I mean, how do I know I have an ops background, but I don’t know anything about the recruiting business. How much training is involved? Well, I knew nothing about franchising before I got in. I knew I knew literally zero about it. So what happens is when a person says to me, Hey, I want to go ahead with it, and then they sign the agreement, what happens is they start an onboarding process and that could be about six weeks. All right? There’s lots of work. There could be some audios, it could be some webinars things. So they’re going to start before they go to either a one to two week training on location.

Bob Koch:

And then some franchisees have their business development person literally come into your backyard and work with you hand to hand. I see from there there’s ongoing webinars, there’s ongoing scenarios. Those types of things take place. They have all annual conventions where you get to meet all the other franchisees in the system and see it’s, it’s, it’s the, the high wire act with a safety net because you’re going to have other people to support you. What you don’t know, somebody else in your system knows to educate you. So you’re in business for yourself, but you’re not alone.

Mindy Thomas:

So that’s a big difference between launching your own private business where there’s no support and then launching a franchise where there’s a tremendous amount of support. And that sounds fantastic. Sounds like a wonderful, wonderful network because you’re not alone. I mean you’re, you’re, you’re a solopreneur Bob, but you have support. I’m a solo preneur with no support making it out here. So it’s been a wonderful journey for me being a solopreneur. And I’ve enjoyed speaking to you about this. I’m curious about the Clint Eastwood syndrome that we spoke about when you chatted last week about you coming on the show. Can you tell our audience what that’s about?

Bob Koch:

The Clint Eastwood syndrome is what happens in companies. You sign on, you’re an it guy or a chain supply guy. You know, you’re in marketing and what happens is you evolve out of that role. But when I say Clint Eastwood, you know, you think of two character roles, correct? Correct. You think of cowboy or cop, and that’s where we get locked in and companies, but our psychic and our career development, we move out beyond that. But companies don’t, don’t see that. And that becomes very frustrating because that’s like driving a car down the road and your wheels aren’t aligned and that the car is shimming. And that’s what happens with people’s career. So when you’re aligned with something, all right, it’s I think it’s where you’re going to perform the best and you’re going to be the happiest. And that’s, and it’s not about the money, it’s about doing something that makes sense and, and values to you. So that’s what I call the cause of the clinics with syndrome. It’s just how companies freeze us in those roles when we literally have outgrown.

Mindy Thomas:

What’s interesting is when I Googled the number of percentage of happily employed people in the U S guess what number came up? Do you believe that 85% of the American public is happily employed? I know they’re employed, but are they happily employed? Do you believe that?

Bob Koch:

I do. Yeah. Because companies change, management change, people get stuck in, in private companies where there’s no chance for growth. Misbalance okay. They’re in and out of airports staying at Hampton Inns and holiday Inns and they don’t get to see their kids. They don’t get to see their family. Well, this, I don’t know if this is fake news, but it was 85% are happily employed, not unhappily employed. And so when I’m thinking about your coaching practice and the numbers of people that you speak to who are those people? They’re unhappily employed. Yes. Well, what does that look like in terms of the profile, why are they looking at franchise opportunities? Because there’s some people have for, for years have had a burning desire and they always keep saying, I want to do something on my own.

Bob Koch:

I want to do something on my own. But they don’t know how to start. That’s the million dollar question. That’s the place to start. So, so they have this, this burning itch, but Oh my God, there’s no course in high school that teaches entrepreneurship. There’s no class out there that sort of guides them on that foot path, you know? And then somehow they connect with me or I connect with them and I invite them to work with me. Okay. Because you can’t be like the 10 year old kid walking out the door and mom says, to do your, do your homework, you have to voluntarily come with an interest to figure out what else could I do? What should that look like? What should that feel like? You know, what gets you out of bed in the morning? You know, what, what gets you excited to do something new and different now, if you can catch that wave of doing something new and exciting, I think that’s what you need to put.

Mindy Thomas:

That’s the intuitive hunch you pay attention to. You follow those kind of clues. When you look over the tenure of your career, I’m very curious whether you’ve been happily employed for most of your work life, most of your career. The reinventions that you engineered yourself. Do you feel like you were happily employed for 20 years in the travel business or 30 years in the travel business then as a franchise coast? Have you experienced job satisfaction over your life?

Bob Koch:

They are big differences. I left the job because the firm wasn’t, it wasn’t ethical and I moved to another firm only to get merged and laid off. I moved towards something because it made sense. So there’s a big difference. People say, Hey, I’m not in a good job and they take the next job just to get away. Yes, that’s wrong. That’s not, that may not have a favorable outcome because you’re moving away. You’ve got to be pulled toward what’s attracting you, what’s, what’s the gravitational pull toward whatever it is you’re looking to do. That’s a clue. Bob. You have a lot of courage and there’s a lot of grit. Are you a former military guy? I don’t know, but you have a fire in your belly and it’s so inspiring. Thank you. I really am enjoying this interview with you and I think it does take a lot of grit to make these moves.

Mindy Thomas:

What can you tell our audience if they should contact you and they’re listening on the edge and they’re not sure they have the courage to pull the trigger and go into business for themselves. There’s no obligation. If they contact you. In fact, his coaching is free. I mean, who can beat that? But you know that it takes a lot to do this. So can you say to our audience? Well I want to thank everyone for watching career chat today and thank my special guest. Bob has been fantastic to reconnect with you and learn more about your alternative career coaching. Please tell our audience how they can contact you if they’re interested. Sure. You can reach me. On my cell phone at six 10, two nine nine 33 10 that’s six 10 to nine nine 33 10. You can find me on LinkedIn if you just typed in Bob Koch jr. I’ll show right up on LinkedIn as your first entry there, or B, K O C H at [inaudible] dot E source coach.com and you can find me that way and if you’d like, we’ll go to a 30 minute interview and figuring out if we should work together or not. And there’s no obligation.

 

Your Career is Your Business. Isn’t it Time For You to Manage it Like a CEO?

Please call Professional Career Counselor Mindy Thomas, MS, CPRW, CLC, CJC, CJDC directly at 610.937.5632 or send us a message. Our offices are located in suburban Philadelphia at 221 North Olive Street in Media, PA, close to Wilmington DE, NYC and Washington DC.

The post Career Chat – Mindy Thomas Interviews Bob Koch, The Franchise Coach appeared first on Thomas Career Consulting.

]]>
https://thomascareerconsulting.com/career-chat-mindy-thomas-interviews-bob-koch-the-franchise-coach/feed 0